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If it sounds too good to be true . . . what should I do? The truth about heavily discounted medication

Posted Monday 09 June 2014 12:58 by Tim Deakin in Uncategorized

online pharmacy

We all love a bargain. Whether it’s £10 off your next grocery shop or making the most of the high-street summer sales, the British are first in the queue. But when it comes to prescription medication cutting corners should never be an option.

The nature of the Internet means that we are able to purchase goods from across the globe at the click of a button. While this means that convenience and competition over pricing has never been better for consumers, it also comes with a downside . . . counterfeit and substandard products.

Just as you may end up with a ‘fake’ handbag or watch, rather than the legitimate one you purchased online in good faith, the same can happen with medication. Unlike a below-par Prada lookalike, though, the price for buying unofficial and unregulated drugs can have serious repercussions for our health.

Only in May, the US Food and Drug Administration led a crack down on online websites that were illegally marketing unlicensed and potentially dangerous prescription drugs over in the States. But it is becoming clear that the volume of unapproved and counterfeit drugs coming in from India, Pakistan, China and Mexico among other countries, is on the increase.

In total, the number of websites found to be in violation of US law on pharmaceuticals ran to nearly 2,000, leading Douglas Stearn, director of the FDA’s Office of Enforcement and Import Operations, to say,

“When consumers buy prescription drugs from outside the legitimate supply chain, they cannot know if the medicines they receive are counterfeit or even if they contain the right active ingredient in the proper dosages. Consumers have little or no legal recourse if they experience a reaction to the unregulated medication or if they receive no therapeutic benefit at all.”

That’s not to mention issues of credit card fraud, identity theft and digital viruses which are also rife on these sites.

 

Choose an online pharmacy registered with the GPhC

prescription medicationIn the UK, rogue websites are also reportedly on the increase, with many failing to meet the strict regulations required by law to sell prescription medication. The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) is the leading regulatory body for the Pharmaceutical industry in the UK and is responsible for determining whether an online pharmacy is licensed, or not.

Patients who want to purchase goods, safe in the knowledge that they are getting exactly what they paid for and not place themselves in any danger should only purchase through pharmacists registered with the GPhC. This will ensure that medications such as prescription Viagra contain the right levels of active ingredient, are not contaminated and do not lead to unexpected side effects.

At Express Pharmacy we believe that ordering online prescription medication should not mean compromising on quality or safety. That’s why we promote our GPhC registration and encourage any patient unsure about placing an order to contact us directly. All of our prescriptions are authorised by qualified pharmacists who work in our own bricks and mortar pharmacies and are always just a phone call away.

Not only that, but we believe in being open and honest with our customers by using independent review site Trustpilot. This allows prospective customers to see the unbiased views of existing Express Pharmacy customers.

For more information on the service we provide and the safest way to order prescription medication online, please call us on 0208 123 0703

 

Ordering online: key points

- Look for the GPhC logo

- Look for a street address and contact information

- Check price – if the price appears to be too good to be true then it probably is

- Search for reviews and testimonials

Image courtesy of Maulleigh

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A fly in the ointment: preparing for unwanted encounters on holiday

Posted Monday 02 June 2014 11:21 by Tim Deakin in Uncategorized

malaria tabletsJetting away on holiday to a far-flung destination is something we all look forward to. Everyone loves relaxing and getting away from the daily grind on a therapeutic break from the norm. But depending on where you choose a home from home, there are a few boxes to be ticked before slipping into your swimwear.

First comes the pleasure–pain of booking and paying for the holiday; then comes the obligatory trip to purchase sun cream, sunglasses and travel insurance. And in amongst those other essentials hides one other task that can sometimes be overlooked –malaria protection.

It’s not surprising that we aren’t all familiar with the ins and outs of anti-malaria treatment in the UK. After all, it is a problem we don’t have to concern ourselves with on our little island. Choose a trip to one of the more exotic holiday destinations in your brochure, though, and you’ll find it’s important to do your homework fast.

 

What is malaria?

Malaria is a serious tropical disease spread by mosquitoes. A single mosquito bite is all it takes for someone to become infected and if not diagnosed and treated promptly, it can be fatal.

The figures speak for themselves. The latest World Malaria Report, published by the World Health Organisation in 2013, states there were 207 million cases of malaria worldwide and 627,000 deaths in 2012. In the UK alone, 1,400 travellers were diagnosed with malaria after returning to the UK, of which two sadly died.

So, if you’re jetting off on holiday, you’re likely to question – “will it affect me?” With malaria present in over 100 countries, the answer could well be “yes”.

The disease is found mainly in regions of the world such as Central and South America, large areas of Africa and Asia, and parts of the Middle East. Malaria contracted on holiday is typically treated with antimalarial medication and the majority of sufferers go on to make a full recovery. In all cases, treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis has been confirmed.

How do I protect myself against malaria?

There is no need to panic if you find that there is a chance of contracting malaria at your holiday destination. But you will be required to take a course of malaria tablets as prescribed by your pharmacist or travel clinician. Buying malaria tablets today is inexpensive and convenient, allowing holiday makers to simply include the course of treatment into their pre-vacation routine.

Of course, with a million of other preparations to make and loose ends to tie up at work, you may find it difficult to visit a pharmacy before you go. At Express Pharmacy, however, we can prescribe malaria tablets online and arrange for delivery direct to your door. As one of the country’s leading online pharmacies, we help to ensure that getting aboard that plane safe and prepared is hassle free.

Order malaria tablets online now, or for more information, call our pharmacy team on 0208 123 0703.

Image courtesy of Jim Gathany

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What goes into establishing a reputable pharmacy?

Posted Monday 02 June 2014 11:03 by Tim Deakin in Uncategorized

online pharmacyWe’ve all heard the saying “You are what you eat”. And if you’re one of the many people who follow this familiar mantra, it’s likely that you pay close attention to the fat, salt and “chemical nasties” in your food. But do you apply the same rules for the medication you ingest?

The recent horsemeat scandal put the Food Standards Agency and other associated regulatory bodies firmly under the spotlight – and rightly so. What is less well publicized, however, is the important role played by the bodies responsible for overseeing the safety and ethical behavior of the UK’s pharmacies.

There’s no denying that prescription drugs can have a hugely beneficial impact. Even those of us who are particularly conscientious about what we put into our bodies can pay little attention to where we source medication when we are feeling under the weather or in pain.

 

What should I be looking out for?

The leading regulatory body for the Pharmaceutical industry in the UK is the General Pharmaceutical Council. The GPhC is responsible for determining whether a pharmacy is licensed, or not. In order to practise in Great Britain, pharmacists must be registered with the GPhC and have met the Council’s detailed requirements including professional, fitness to practise and ethical standards.

Anyone who is not registered with the GPhC but practises as a pharmacist, or refers to themselves as such, is breaking the law and can be prosecuted.

The GPhC’s website enables people considering purchasing prescription drugs online to check out the credentials of a pharmacy and ensure they are a registered and regulated pharmacist.

 

Does the same count for online pharmacies?

Reputable online pharmacies, such as Express Pharmacy, are subject to the same rigorous checks as any other. In order to trade, an online pharmacy must conform to GPhC guidelines in order to give customers the same peace of mind when purchasing goods.

A GPhC registered pharmacy is easily spotted online as they will display the registered pharmacy logo on the homepage, complete with unique registration number.

A simple click on the logo on the Express Pharmacy website directs you to the GPhC directory, where full details – including registered business address and online trading name can be found. Importantly, these are the details of our very own bricks and mortar pharmacy where we see patients in person daily.

By running a physical pharmacy alongside our online pharmacy, our patients can be sure that there is always a pharmacist on hand to prescribe appropriate medication when they need it most – as required by law.

It is always strongly advisable that if you are looking to buy prescription medication on the internet, you choose a registered online pharmacy. The nature of the internet is such that some medicines are now readily available from online suppliers who have no professional qualifications or healthcare expertise which raises a number of concerns.

Before you purchase online, consider the following things:

- Are the prices much lower than you would expect from a pharmacy?

- Can you see a PGhC logo or signs of accreditation from a relevant regulatory body anywhere on the website?

- Is there any mention of qualified pharmacists?

- Are the brand names or active ingredients recognisable on the medications?

- Are there testimonials on the website?

For more information on Express Pharmacy, please visit the About Us section.

Image courtesy of Theihb

Comments

Verena Moorhead on Monday 15 February 2016 18:27

Hi, ive been taking Prilosec for over a year now and I feel much better. Ive heard over the news that taken over a long period is not good and there are high risks of bone fractures. I have also noticed im getting shorter, could that be from Prilosec?

Can I continue taking Prilosec on change to Omeprazole? thank you.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Thursday 16 June 2016 11:14
Reply to Verena Moorhead

Hi Verena,

Thank you for reading our blog. Prilosec is a branded version of Omeprazole and so there would be no difference to switch to Omeprazole or LOSEC.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply

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Omeprazole or Lansoprazole? What Is the Difference?

Posted Tuesday 06 May 2014 18:10 by Harman Bhamra in Acid Reflux

Omeprazole and Lansoprazole belong to a family of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. Either one might be prescribed as an acid reflux treatment.

The stomach naturally produces acid in order to aid food digestion and to kill bacteria.

However as this acid is an irritant, a mucus layer is needed to line the stomach in order to provide protection from damage caused by the acid.

When this layer is broken down, inflammation and ulceration of the stomach may occur and could develop further to more serious conditions if not treated. Patients taking Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) such as Ibuprofen or Naproxen may also experience these symptoms.

acid reflux treatment

Other conditions include Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease (acid reflux) whereby acid can escape into the oesophagus leading to heartburn and/or oesophagitis.

Proton pump inhibitor drugs such as omeprazole and lansoprazole are designed to prevent too much acid from being produced by the cells lining the stomach. This will counteract the formation of ulcers, reduce acid reflux and aid the healing procedure.

There have been many debates into the differences between omeprazole and lansoprazole. Both can be used as an effective acid reflux treatment. Although they are from the same family of drugs, there are slight differences that may need to be considered when taking these drugs.

Lansoprazole has been known to be the more effective acid reflux treatment and in some cases, considered faster acting. However antacids such as Gaviscon can reduce the absorption of this medicine from the gastrointestinal tract and may decrease its efficiency. Therefore Lansoprazole should not be taken within an hour of taking antacids.

You should also consult your doctor if you are anaemic or iron deficient when taking Lansoprazole. This is because when there is a reduction in acid in the stomach, the absorption of iron and ferrious sulphate is affected; thus reducing the efficacy of these drugs.

Omeprazole may enhance the anti-clotting effects of the anticoagulant warfarin. You should check your INR levels (blood clotting time) before taking this medication and upon stopping it.

With both medications, it has been suggested by recent studies that the risk of bone fractures is increased when taken on a long term basis. This can be managed by taking enough calcium and vitamin D to reduce this risk.

To find out more about the range of acid reflux treatments that Express Pharmacy offer, please visit our acid reflux treatment page.

If you are still unsure about which acid reflux treatment is suitable for you, please contact our Patient Support team.

Comments

Denise Corless on Friday 05 February 2016 11:51

I have been taking Lansoprazole for just over 2 years now (since having chemotherapy) and have been really happy with the results.

If I don't take my daily tablet after about 2/3 days I know about it, I'm just wondering if changes to my diet could help my condition (if yes, what would you suggest).

I was also a little concerned about the statement "the risk of bone fractures is increased when taken on a long term basis." Due to other medication (Letrozole) I'm already take Alendronic acid 70mg (weekly) & Adcal-D3 (daily), would you recommend anything else?

Thanks in advance for your advice

Reply
danielle Flood on Saturday 02 April 2016 04:18
Reply to Denise Corless

My partner was given diet advice when prescribed this medication for the rest of his life. If possible he is to avoid tea, coffee and energy drinks such as redbull. Food wise the advice was to eat a healthy balanced meal of fish/meat with veg/salad and small portion of cards eg potatoes pasta. We have subsequently found some spicy food such as jalapeños can inflame his condition, as well as too much snack food such as crisps. We were informed that the best way to control the acid was to just take the tablet as prescribed. There's a noticeable difference after 2 days if he doesn't inspite of significant dietary changes.His condition is also exacerbated by lots of stress so keeping this to a minimum has been helpful.

Reply
Dominik on Sunday 29 May 2016 08:48
Reply to Denise Corless

Only my experience and we're all different of course, but I used to have the same, but now largely control acid through diet.....hardly ever eat bread or pasta, although rice noodles seem to be fine. Lunchtime sandwiches have been replaced with a salad, eggs for breakfast etc. I now only take Lanzoprazole symptomatically and usually after drinking beer (may be yeast related?).

Reply
yvonne rautenbach on Sunday 13 November 2016 21:34
Reply to Dominik

is it ok to take PPIs just when needed (symptomatically) or maybe for a 1 week out of a month? I find prescriptions are too expensive in UK and try to economise a bit. I also have spine fractures from young so dont want to invite bone problems by taking PPIs all the time

Reply
Shona on Friday 22 December 2017 10:24
Reply to yvonne rautenbach

If you are finding difficulties in paying for Individual items. Might be worth enquiry for a prepaid prescription. 3 moths used to be about 12 for as many meds as needed. Why waste the NHS money by taking a prescription when you only want to take one week if a months prescription.

Reply
Craig Diver on Wednesday 07 March 2018 20:47
Reply to yvonne rautenbach

Yvonne when it comes to the UK as you call it the system you describe does not exist! Each nation state of the UK has its own rules on prescriptions and in Scotland and Wales there are No prescription charges whatsoever and in England there are exempt categories although there is I believe £8.60 an item charge for those not exempt!

Not saying that to be awkward either its just in case anyone is confused as to what the position is!

Reply
yvonne rautenbach on Thursday 17 May 2018 11:48
Reply to Craig Diver

Hello Craig thanks for taking trouble to reply but sorry I dont understand ..what system???? I live in UK and i get free prescriptions but only because i am 61.

Reply
karen Cheetham on Wednesday 08 June 2016 23:08
Reply to Denise Corless

You should thoroughly investigate the benefits of a vegan diet which will make life changing differences to you health. The reason you may suffer fractures taking these meds is because they deplete the calcium levels and other essential vitamins as well as mopping up the acid.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Thursday 16 June 2016 10:41
Reply to karen Cheetham

Hi Karen,

Thank you for reading our blog! Vegan diets have many health benefits, however it is still vital to ensure that your body is getting the right vitamins and minerals required to function at its optimum. By adopting a vegan diet, you are restricting several vitamins including B vitamins, iron and calcium which would be absorbed into the body from meat and dairy products, so it is important to take supplements to replace any missing vital minerals.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
geraldine.mcmahon@telenet.be on Sunday 01 October 2017 17:36
Reply to Marina Abdalla

There's a great deal of misunderstanding about ideal diets. It's safest to say that we need different foods in different proportions at different phases of life and, most importantly, eat less of everything.Also, if you have extreme GERD, you need medicine to heal your oesophagus, vagus nerve and vocal cords. It's not joke and GERD effects a lot more than the throat; some doctors suggest that it contributes to atrial fibrillation!

When it was first introduced, it was suggested to take it for a few weeks maximum. Dietary changes are certainly helpful: caffeine, white flour, all sugars, for some people, give up grains entirely. You need to read a lot and learn a lot to find out what's right for you. Vitamin K2, A and D3 in combo helps everything.

Reply
Leigh vowles on Saturday 14 October 2017 21:01
Reply to Denise Corless

I have a hiatus hernia and have done for 3 years. If I didn't take my 40mg omeprozale each day I would get really bad acid reflux by the evening. I put it down to the the hernia but have recently gone from full on meat eater to vegan.

It may not work for you but I found giving up dairy meant I don't need to take omeprozale nearly as often. I now take maybe one or two tablets a week down from around 28 a week.

It may not work for you but is worth a try.

Reply
Samantha on Saturday 20 February 2016 07:59

I have a little one with a Gatrostomy tube who receives 5mg omeprazole twice a day. The pharmacy now gave us a box of lansoprazole (30mg capsules). Is it safe to give the full capsule (half morning and other half evening) or can I give just 15mg a day. This is for long term use; she currently is 6 years old and weighs 13,4kg. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Monday 22 February 2016 12:06
Reply to Samantha

Hi Samantha,

Thank you for having a read of our blog. It is best to follow the instructions that have been given by the pharmacists at the hospital. You will not be able to split the Lansoprazole as they are capsules.

As we do not know the full medical history, of your daughter, it is best to speak to your GP or to call the hospital and consult with them about which would be best to take and when.

I hope this has been of some help to you.

Reply
Valmunks on Tuesday 17 April 2018 14:43
Reply to Samantha

I have been taking Lansoprazole for 8 years last year my doctor put up the amount to 4 a day 30 mg I was diagnosed with barrats?

Reply
Lynne Hayden on Thursday 26 May 2016 17:27

I have been taking Lansoprazole 15mg for well over 15 years as the valve in my oesophagus doesn't close. I tried two other types but found this one to be the best. However I now have a problem - I am living abroad at the moment and my surgery in the UK says I cannot be registered with them anymore as my new UK address is out of their area. So I have one more prescription of tablets and then that's it. I am trying to see if I can manage without them but by day two its unbearable. Where I am living they only have 30mg and the capsules can't be cut in half. Is there a reputable website in UK where I can purchase 15mg as I really can't manage without taking them-its so unbearable whether I eat or not!

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 18:06
Reply to Lynne Hayden

Dear Lynne,

Thank you for reading our blog. We can supply Lansoprazole 15mg to some countries within Europe. To see a list of countries of which we can supply to, you can click on our FAQ section of the website.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Natalie K on Thursday 30 June 2016 06:16
Reply to Lynne Hayden

As the article stated, Lansoprazole and Omrprazole are very similar. I live in the US, so I am unsure about UK pharmacies. However, Omrprazole, also known as Prilosec, is sold over the counter here in 7-14 day trials. It is a bit more expensive as my Prilosec prescription for 40 mg of 30 capsules is under 10$, but the over the counter Prilosec for 20 mg of 14 tablets is about 20$. However, it is definitely worth it to not have the terrible, horrendous, and debilitating pain when not taking the medication so the extra cost may be worth it. Though you may need to take a double dose of Prilosec, 40 mg, as you take 30 mg of the Lansoprazole. Plus I've heard Lansoprazole works a bit better than Omrprazole (Prilosec) so you may need more. I used to take 40 mg of Omrprazole but the doctor prescribed me 30 mg of Lansoprazole which is actually take together and it works amazingly.

I have terrible stomach issues with gallstones and a ton of stomach and esophagus irritation. I will have acid come up within 1 minute of taking my first of food! I kept thinking the bottom half of my yogurt went bad since it happened that fast! Then I lost a ton of weight so now I'm barely 120 pounds and I'm only 26 years old. I would feel soo nauseous that the doctor prescribed Zofran, a type of nausea medication for cancer patients which didn't work that great on its own; but when I mixed the Zofran with 2 Pepto Bismal tablets it worked amazingly! Then to help for the actual stomach pains I take 10 mg of Dicyclomine which is an antispasmodic. Within 20 minutes of taking the Dicyclomine, after feeling like I'm being ripped in two with glass grinding in my stomach, all the pain completely disappears!

However the Zofran, Pepto Bismal, and Dicyclomine can have weird side effects such as dry mouth where no amount of water helps and bad constipation with black stools that hurts pretty bad but I just take stool softener which helps a bit. However Dicyclomine has the worst side effects of really blurry vision so I can't take it before I drive or if I have to drive home so I don't eat out unless someone can drive me home in case I have bad pains. Then it also causes issues with being very sensitive to sunlight as it hurts your eyes. It also makes it so you can't sweat so you feel this "dry heat" even in room temperature and you can have heat stroke easily as you cannot cool down by sweating. However, as this medication is fast acting, it is also fast stopping as I am supposed to take it 4 times a day but I just take it when I have stomach pain. The side effects will only last an hour or so but its far better than spending many hours curled up in bed in agony; which seems like a super amazing trade off to me!

Managing stomach issues is all about mixing and matching medication that work well together. You also have to watch out for counteracting the medications as well. Such as antacid, like Pepto Bismal, can't be taken 2-3 hours before taking Dicyclomine as it causes the Dicyclomine to not work as fast or even as well which I do not want! So I take the Pepto Bismal and Zofran combination only after I take the Dicyclomine if I still have an residual nausea as it can be taken after the Dicyclomine starts to work. I also have a second Doctor (Uncle) whom I talk to get his opinion on what I am taking just in case. It is always a good idea to get a second opinion on the medication you are taking; even if it's from anyone in the medical field as they will probably have some knowledge on the subject. Obviously you want to follow your Doctor's directions; it is just nice to know that other medical professionals agree with your Doctor. Plus they can also tell you more about your condition than what you Doctor may be able to tell you in the short time of your appointment and they can help come up with any questions you want to ask your doctor as well. So if you have a friend, or even an acquaintance who's a doctor, nurse, or anything else, pick their brain on the subject! I always wait to speak to my Uncle before I start taking any new medication, especially since he knows all of my medical issues of my whole life which is far more than what a doctor I just met may know. Plus, I love having that double sense of security that two doctors agree that I am receiving the correct treatment as it makes me feel a lot better about putting any new foreign substances in my body.

I hope this helps you and any one else who may be having similar problems! There are so many options out there to help so never stop looking!

Reply
Dee on Monday 13 March 2017 07:40
Reply to Natalie K

Poor you sounds horrendous all these pills you are taking, im not a dtr or have any medical training im just a housewife.When i had some stomach problems i used slippery elm powder its an old fashioned remedy wouldnt hurt to try it good luck

Reply
Janice on Tuesday 21 March 2017 08:01
Reply to Natalie K

Hi Natalie

With regards your gallstones- apparently it happens with losing weight too fast. Prior to having a Gastric Sleeve done, all tests done prior to surgery came back "in good order, not fatty tissue" 3 months after I'm still unable to eat solids and take Nexmezol 20mg and 30mg of Lansoloc in the morning before food and 1 Lansoloc at night before supper

for acid reflux and heartburn.

Much to my disgust I have just been informed that I have gallstones of which no one told be was a result of rapid weight lose. On investigating found that there are 3 different types of meds that can be taken to prevent the gallstones - totally disgusted in lack of pre op information

Reply
A Hombeuel on Friday 03 March 2017 07:00
Reply to Lynne Hayden

take your prescription for the required 15mg lanzoprozole from your doctor and send it to an online pharmacy.

they post your medicine to your home

Reply
Lindy Page on Wednesday 01 June 2016 15:29

Hi there,I somatimes have bouts of acid reflux and take omeprazol when needed but recently was diagonsed with having past mini strokes,now on daily clopdigrol,Is it safe to take both these meds.Thank you for your response.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 18 June 2016 12:09
Reply to Lindy Page

Hi Lindy,

In response to your query, I wouldn't recommend taking the two medication together as Omeprazole can enhance the 'anti-clotting' effect of Clopidogrel. Lansoprazole is an alternative that would be safe, however please consult your GP before initiating any new medication.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 18 June 2016 12:11
Reply to Lindy Page

Hi Lindy,

In response to your query, I wouldn't recommend taking the two medication together as Omeprazole can enhance the 'anti-clotting' effect of Clopidogrel. Lansoprazole is an alternative that would be safe, however please consult your GP before initiating any new medication.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Post edited by Marina Abdalla on 05/10/2016

Reply
Peter on Saturday 04 March 2017 20:21

I have ulcer for more than 10 years. I used to treat it but after sometime i got the pain again especially when I eat anything fried and when I was so much stress.

What medication could I use to treat it once and for all.

Reply
Tom McDonald on Wednesday 26 August 2015 23:40

I have been taking Omeprazole for a couple of years after being diagnosed with a hiatus hernia. Back in April, I suffered some TIA's, and have been taking clopidogrel and simvastatin. My wife went to collect my repeat prescription, and the chemist has changed the omeprazole to lasoprazole, due to the other medications I am now taking. Bearing in mind what you said about omeprazole enhancing anti-clotting, I would have thought that this would work better. Your guidance would be appreciated.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:01
Reply to Tom McDonald

Hi Tom,

Too much 'anti-clotting' or blood thinning can be an adverse side effect, ie. can lead to bruising, prolonged/leading stomach problems; Lansoprazole is better as it can achieve the right amount of blood thinning necessary to prevent further TIAs without adverse side effects.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Sylvia Kinloch on Tuesday 14 June 2016 12:50

I am on lansoprazole which suits me well. They have changed the 15 mg from white to yellow which I am allergic to. Is any supplier still making white.? Thank you

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 18 June 2016 12:12
Reply to Sylvia Kinloch

Hi Sylvia,

As far as I am aware, Bristol brand are still white tablets of Lansoprazole. You can ask your pharmacist to source these for you as a special request, however this is not guaranteed.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Aye Mon on Tuesday 14 June 2016 19:48

HI

Can I take Lansoprazole with multivitamin ?

Thank you for your help

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Thursday 16 June 2016 10:33
Reply to Aye Mon

Dear Aye,

Thank you for reading our blog. There are no contraindications between multi-vitamins and lansoprazole, and so you can take these both together.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Nicola cannan on Friday 04 March 2016 13:36

I have ran out of omerprazole. 20mg my partner takes 1 every morning will be 2 days till prescription is ready would it be okay to give him lansoprazole 30mg till I get his prescription in a few days?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:41
Reply to Nicola cannan

Hi Nicola,

I wouldn't recommend taking your husbands medication, but to see your local pharmacist who will be able to supply you with an emergency supply of Omeprazole, until you see your GP to write you a new prescription.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Joan B on Sunday 27 March 2016 23:15

I have been prescribed 75mg clopidogrel following a stroke last year. I was told not to take omeprazole as it could affect the action of clopidogrel. I am taking 15mg of lanzoprazole for acid reflux which I was told was ok. Now i see these 2 drugs are similar so is it ok to take lanzoprazole. Thank you

Reply
Andy on Monday 02 May 2016 15:33

Hi, I have been taking Lansoprazole for about 2/3weeks & have been experiencing disorientation / dizziness etc.. Is this a normal side effect? I was perscribed Lansoprazole after an endoscopy found i had a hiatus hernia. It just seems strange that it's effecting me mentaly???

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:59
Reply to Andy

Hi Andy,

Disorientation and dizziness is a common side effect of Lansoprazole, however if this continues further then I would recommend to see your GP to discuss how you are getting along with the medication, and explain the side effects you are suffering from.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Harvey Samuel on Saturday 07 May 2016 08:51

I have been using Lanzaprazole successfully for a hiatus hernia condition for several years. Today I had some stents inserted and was given Omeprazole by the Doctor at the hospital as I had not mentioned it to him. Is it wise to take these 2 medicines at the same time.

Many thanks,

Harvey Samuel

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 18:01
Reply to Harvey Samuel

Hi Harvey,

Thank you for reading our blog. It is unusual to be prescribed both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole at the same time as they both have the same mechanism of action. I would recommend to consult your GP with regards to this matter.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Sarah Robinson on Wednesday 09 November 2016 09:01

How long after taking lansoprazole can you then take naproxen?

Reply
Helen Caine on Saturday 31 October 2015 15:42

that's interesting I'm on Omeprazole and I've had problems with my iron and ferritin levels I have acid reflux, and a slight hernia, (plus B12 deficiency and an underactive thyroid) a strong family history of Barrett's esophagus, and anemia. I can't take iron tablets so recently had iron IV therapy, I assume this is why my GP won't try me on Lansoprazole, fortunately I have a higher than average bone density so am not overly worried about bone thinning.

Reply
Dean Irwin on Saturday 19 March 2016 16:58

Hi...I've been on omeprazole 40mg for a good few years now for acid reflux ,past 3 weeks the reflux has came back, stomach and chest on fire and sometimes my throat, worse at night...doctor put me on Lanzoprazole 60mg a day in the morning...I'm wondering if I can take 30 morning 30 bed time thinking it might help how bad it is at night? I was taking 300mg zantac (ranitidine) at night for few days til I saw doc as I had these from before and they did calm it down at night and gave me sleep...is it best to take the 300 Zantac and keep doing that alongside 40 omeprazole daily or will I start take lanzoprazole 60 on its own just in mornings. I also suffer depression and anxiety and am so stressed with this flare up, need on top of it asap.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:44
Reply to Dean Irwin

Hi Dean,

Thank you for reading our blog. In severe cases, it isn't a problem to take Lansoprazole and Ranitidine together, but please confirm with your GP, that they wish you to do this.

You can split the dose and take 30mg in the morning and 30mg in the evening.

If you are taking Lansoprazole, then there is no need to take Omeprazole as they both have the same mechanism of action.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
JOHN mcGovern on Monday 13 March 2017 21:26
Reply to Dean Irwin

I know this may alarm you it did me, I have been taken omeprazole for a few years also, I have just read that it has been linked with dementia and a host of other things like depression and anxiety it also says it cause a b12 deficiency I don't know how true these reports are but i must admit i feel my memory is not as got as it was a couple of years ago I spoke to my GP about it he said don't read stuff off the internet just increase your dose im worried.

Reply
Muhammed Ravat on Thursday 03 December 2015 18:08

hello. I have been taking lansoprazol daily for almost 3 years and found that it helped control the acid reflux and heartburn. the past 4 weeks suddenly my heart burn is back and the lansoprazol is not working on me. my gp has prescribed me to try omeprazole but it has not helped . please any suggestions if there is any other types od medication or treatment which may help me. the heart burn is becoming stressfull.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:24
Reply to Muhammed Ravat

Hi Muhammed,

Ranitidine has a different mode of action to Lansoprazole and can be purchased as Zantac. However I would recommend to consult your local pharmacist or GP before purchasing to ensure it is suitable for you to take.

I hope this has been of some help to you

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Lesley Waugh on Wednesday 13 July 2016 22:44
Reply to Muhammed Ravat

If it comes on at night lie in a near upright position , so you are comfortable and try and not eat a lot of fatty foods eat regularly (something I am hopeless at as only eat when hungry) please do not let it get bad as it burns your esophagus which happened to me before I took Lansoprazole hope this helps.

Reply
Kris on Monday 29 August 2016 19:37

I've been taking Omeprazole for several years, I was recently switched to Lansoprazole because I'm trying to get pregnant. I also need to stop the PPI for a week every 6 months for a blood test.

I started Lansoprazole for about a week and a half before coming off for my blood test. I started taking it on a Thursday morning and that evening began having very loose, mucous-y stools. I've been having the loose stools multiple times a day since then (it's now Monday)

Could this be from the Lansoprazole??

I have no other symptoms other than mild bloating, but nothing else. (No fever, nausea, chills, vomiting, gas, etc.)

I also have celiac disease if that matters.

I'm hoping this isn't the Lansoprazole, as I can't take Omeprazole while pregnant but cannot get by without a PPI for heartburn.

Reply
Sadia on Thursday 27 April 2017 21:44

I used both of these medication lansaprozole and omperzole for quite a long time but I have feeling of saliva stuck in my month it's so annoying

Reply
yvonne rautenbach on Saturday 12 December 2015 18:42

I cant understand why it should be necessary to take Gaviscon if a PPI drug is doing its job correctly?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Sunday 13 December 2015 18:19
Reply to yvonne rautenbach

Hi Yvonne,

Thank you for having a read of our blog. There are several reasons as to why some people prefer PPI's like Omeprazole and Lansoprazole, over Gavison.

The two medications have different modes of action and so will work differently. Some people achieve the effects of the medication by taking Gaviscon, however some may not.

Furthermore, Gaviscon is an OTC medication, which means that it can be purchased at any pharmacy, over the counter. Lansoprazole and Omeprazole both require a prescription. You will therefore need to see a doctor or get a private prescription, to obtain this medication; which many people may not have time to do.

I hope this has resolved any queries you may have had.

Reply
Carmen on Monday 09 May 2016 03:40
Reply to Marina Abdalla

Not anymore - omeprazole and lansoprazole can both be purchased OTC.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Monday 06 June 2016 18:16
Reply to Carmen

Hi Carmen,

Thank you for having a read of our blog. Both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole are both still Prescrition Only Medication (POM) and require a prescription from your GP to obtain it.

Express Pharmacy.

Reply
David on Wednesday 23 November 2016 14:09
Reply to Marina Abdalla

Omeprazole can be OTC. I bought some last week in Boots!

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 20 December 2016 11:03
Reply to David

Dear David,

Thank you for reading our blog! You're not wrong at all, Omeprazole is available over the counter in some pharmacies at lower doses. However, if you require a more potent does, a prescription is required to obtain it.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support Team.

Reply
yvonne rautenbach on Sunday 13 November 2016 21:28
Reply to Marina Abdalla

but what does Gaviscon do which the PPI cant? Why would anyone take a PPI and Gaviscon both?

Reply
yvonne rautenbach on Wednesday 14 December 2016 19:24
Reply to Marina Abdalla

perhaps i need to make this question clearer

Why would anyone take Gaviscon at same time as a PPI drug? I thought a PPI was doing the job of stopping acid?

Reply
Jackie on Sunday 30 October 2016 07:00

Hi, great blog, am learning lots.

I've had acid reflux for around 5 years and taken lanzoprazole and omeprazole. I was changed to esomeprazole by a private specialist after chronic acid and food regurgitation. My gp prescribed this for a few months then changed it to Omeprazole saying Esomeprazole is too expensive! After a gastroscopy yesterday I was found to have a 2 cm sliding hiatus hernia and gord. My question is, is Omeprazole best for this and as I like to minimise medication, can I just take as needed rather than everyday?

Reply
Sue tod on Tuesday 03 October 2017 05:19
Reply to Jackie

Hi I have suffered from Gerd now for the last 16 years, Iam now taking esomprazole ,these are more expensive but are better. I used to take omprazole and lanzoprazole . I.also take ranatidine in the evening.

Reply
Mark Sockwell on Thursday 25 February 2016 01:10

I have both Barrett's Esophagus and acid reflux. Last November, my doctor put me on 40mg omeprazole. After about six weeks, I developed a rash over my back, chest and arms that itched horribly. I went to a dermatologist and they determined it was medicine related and the omeprazole was the only thing new. I stopped taking it five days ago and the rash has slowly receeded. I was wondering if lansoprazole is closely related that may cause the same reaction. Thanks in advance.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:39
Reply to Mark Sockwell

Dear Mark,

Thank you for reading our blog. In response to your query, Lansoprazole has the same mode of action as Omeprazole. However, as it is a different drug, it is not guaranteed whether it will cause the same rash or not. It is highly recommended to consult your GP for further advice.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Carol Chapman on Friday 22 July 2016 14:34

I have taken Omeprazole for a couple of years and it works well for me. However I am allergic to colour in meds and my pharmacy says it is unable to obtain any white in tablet or capsule form.Please could you possibly recommend manufacturers that still make white Omeprazole .

Thank you

Reply
Aljundi on Thursday 16 February 2017 08:42

هل دواء الامبيرازول او اللانسبريزول لهم علاقة بالطمانينة النفسية هل يعتبر هذا الدواء مطمئن نفسي؟ وشكرا

Reply
Sue on Friday 12 August 2016 16:10

Hi,

I have really appreciated reading patients' queries and your excellent answers.

I understand I have to take lansoprazole 30 minutes before food. Does that include drinks like tea (taken with a little milk but no sugar in my case)?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 13 August 2016 12:39
Reply to Sue

Hi Sue,

Thank you for your wonderful comment; we take pride in our patient support and like to help all patients who have any queries or concerns.

With regards to taking Lansoprazole with tea, it is recommended to take the medication with solid food, rather than just a liquid alone.

I hope this has been of some help to you.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Sandra Galloway on Wednesday 27 July 2016 09:40

I have been taking Lansoprazole for 15 days now for reflux. How long does it take to start working. Some days I feel good others really rough when I wake up. I've had endoscopy and colonoscopy and hospital said just keep taking my peptac. But my dr diagnosed reflux. I took prune juice last year for 5 weeks for a blockage and had diarraha for 2 hours every day. That cleared but left me with this reflux and anxiety. Will these tablets work in time. Dr wants me to take them for 3 months. Thank you.

Reply
Kath on Saturday 09 July 2016 15:43

I have just been prescribed lansoprozole and within 3 hrs i moved my bowels which i got it for . I would like to know if i have to take a tablet every day as if i am out i dont want to think i need the toilet .thanks

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 19 July 2016 17:31
Reply to Kath

Hi Kath,

Thanks for reading our blog. Lansoprazole may have this as a side effect, particularly in those taking the medication for the first time. I would recommend to see your GP if this side effect persists, as it may be uncomfortable and unpleasant, and they may be able to prescribe you an alternative; however, I would assume that after taking Lansoprazole continuously, those side effects will go away.

I hope this has been of some help to you.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support Team.

Reply
Asif khan on Tuesday 07 July 2015 03:18

Thanks that's very clear it's very help full

Reply
Harman Bhamra on Sunday 26 July 2015 14:21
Reply to Asif khan

Thank you for taking the time to read the article!

Express Pharmacy Patient Support

Reply
Brian Barlass on Saturday 25 July 2015 08:54

I take Lanzaprazol and have done for 15years could this cause gut and pain in the kidney area

Reply
Harman Bhamra on Sunday 26 July 2015 14:21
Reply to Brian Barlass

Hi Brian,

Our advice would be to see your doctor immediately. It is very difficult to diagnose without an endoscopy, however, if the pain does not subside then it could be an ulcer.

If you would like to speak to a pharmacist in confidence, please do not hesitate to contact us on +44 123 0703 or by writing to help@expresspharmacy.co.uk.

I hope that helps!

Express Pharmacy Patient Support

Reply
Stephen on Wednesday 05 August 2015 11:54

I found this answered my question very well and the information given was very informative and and easy to understand.

Reply
Harman Bhamra on Friday 09 October 2015 16:41
Reply to Stephen

Thank you for you for the positive comment Stephen!

Reply
Pauline Griffiths on Wednesday 12 August 2015 10:18

I have suffered with Silent Reflux for some time, my main symptom being a lump in my throat ( Globus). Doctor has changed my meds from Lansoprazole to Omeprazole. Why do you think she has done this, as both meds seem very similar. Thanks.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Wednesday 14 October 2015 16:48
Reply to Pauline Griffiths

Hi Pauline,

Omeprazole and Lansoprazole, both have a similar mechanism of action. i.e they both reduce the amount of acid secretion in the stomach. However, these tablets affect individuals in different ways. For some, Lansoprazole may be more effective, and for others, Omeprazole may be the more effective tablet. One is not known to be more effective than the other. Your doctor may have changed this tablet to see the effects of the medication on you as an individual.

I hope this has been of some help to you!

Reply
Chetna on Wednesday 14 June 2017 14:08
Reply to Pauline Griffiths

Hi all... have been diagnosed with Hiatus Hernia, 2 weeks ago and am Lanzoprazole a day as well, don't think it has helped much, still feel a lump in my throat and it worsens as the day proceeds. It could be Globus Hystericus too, is this the same prescription you need for treating that. I hate this feeling and the fear of eating as well. I hope this is not a permanent thing, happy to hear from others on this site.

Reply
Bob lord on Thursday 10 September 2015 05:35

Is a stomach ulcer always require surgery?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Wednesday 14 October 2015 16:53
Reply to Bob lord

Hi Bob,

It is recommended to always check with your GP, if you have suspected stomach ulcers. The doctor would usually need to run through several tests, and usually prescribe a course of antibiotics before surgery; should it lead to surgery.

Reply
Andrew Holliday on Sunday 22 November 2015 08:37

Hi have been prescribed lansoprazole for suspected gastritis . The most painful condition I've ever had to endure . Can I take gaviscon at the same time ? And what are best painkillers to take with it thanks

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Sunday 22 November 2015 12:06
Reply to Andrew Holliday

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for having a read of our article.

It's highly advised not to take Gaviscon and Lansoprazole at the same time, as there is a slight interaction between the two drugs. Provided that there is atleast a two hour interval between taking them, then it should be fine.

Any painkillers are safe to take with both these medications, but for precautionary measures, I would advise to avoid stronger pills such as Naproxen. Paracetamol and Ibuprofen would be suitable painkillers to take.

I hope this has helped.

Reply
Selliah on Saturday 10 October 2015 04:12

Very good informative service and the article is well written and formulated in very clear plain English.

Reply
Harman Bhamra on Saturday 10 October 2015 08:08
Reply to Selliah

Thank you Selliah. We are glad it came in useful!

Reply
Natasha on Saturday 10 October 2015 22:19

Hi I've been taking omepazole for about 5 years now. I've just had a camera into my stomach and been diagnosed with a hiatas hernia. Could you tell me why I have to change to lansoprazole

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:04
Reply to Natasha

Hi Natasha,

Thank you for reading our blog. Have you been started on any other medication?

Both drugs have the same mode of action to reduce acid secretion in the stomach. This is the GP's clinical decision, and so therefore will need to be discussed with them, but clinically there is little difference between them.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Wendyv on Saturday 24 October 2015 08:18

I have a constant cough which I'm sure is gerd related , but my doctor doesn't seem to think so , I have been on omeprazole just over a year , but now he's changed me lansoprazole . I don't know why .

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:08
Reply to Wendyv

Dear Wendy,

Thank you for reading our blog. Have you been started on any other medication?

Both drugs have the same mode of action to reduce acid secretion in the stomach. This is the GP's clinical decision, and so therefore will need to be discussed with them, but clinically there is little difference between them.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Hazel Robinson on Sunday 11 October 2015 18:10

I have hypertension and had a heart attack 8years ago and a stomach ulcer 30years ago, I've always suffered bouts of acid reflux. I take Tromalyt 150mgs daily which is slow release aspirin, among other drugs. I was prescribed Ulcotenal for indigestion and acid reflux which solved the problem. However, to save money this has been changed to Omeprazol and the reflux is back. Is this coincidence or is there a difference in the composition of the drugs which could cause this?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 20 October 2015 17:51
Reply to Hazel Robinson

Hi Hazel,

Ulcotenal (Pantoprazole) has the same mechanism of action as Omeprazole, i.e. it reduces the level of acid secretion from the stomach. Therefore, theoretically, this drug should produce the same effects, however, in reality different drugs vary with different individuals.

I can only ascertain that it is by chance that the Omeprazole did not work. I suggest that you approach your doctor for the Ulcotenal, if you have found that this is the only medication that has worked for you in the past.

Reply
Anne Hayes on Tuesday 24 November 2015 21:12

I took Fosavance for 5 years, then my GP said I should stop. This was about 5 years ago. I now take Demilos (calcium + Vit D3) daily. I was taking omeprazole 3 times per week for slight stomach disorder, but my GP said that I should increase this to daily because of the Demilos. However, I see from your article that omeprazole taken daily increases the chance of bone fracture and that calcium + Vit D should be taken to counteract this risk. This seems to turn on its head what my GP told me. What do you think?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Wednesday 25 November 2015 10:27
Reply to Anne Hayes

Hi Anne,

Thanks for reading and commenting on our blog. Omeprazole taken along with Vitamin D and calcium should not increase the risk of bone fractures, the interaction mentioned above is not a significant one and sometimes may not affected the bone so much. However, I would advise that you should leave at least an hours gap between the medication.

Reply
Laura on Saturday 02 January 2016 01:47

Hi, I was wondering if you could help.

My husband began taking lanzoprazole about a year ago for his stomach condition and after a few months, I had noticed a definite change in his mood. He'd become very aggressive, short tempered and irritable. I decided to speak to him about it and we then booked a doctors appointment together. The doctor immediately dismissed the idea, but decided to change his tablets anyway. My husbands mood improved after a few weeks of taking the new pills.

Since that appointment, he had gone back to the doctor again as his stomach condition had worsened and the doctor then prescribed omeprazole. I hadn't really thought much about it until now, a few weeks down the line when the tablets have begun to take effect and where I know his mood has changed to this aggressive form once more. Is this a side effect or coincidence?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 02 January 2016 10:32
Reply to Laura

Dear Laura,

It is indeed possible that Lansoprazole or even Omeprazole could cause a change in mood, in particular low mood (depression). Considering that both tablets have the same mode of action, if your husband is experiencing side effects to Lansoprazole it is possible he could experience something similar when taking Omperazole. Please bear in mind though that is an uncommon side effect (1 in 100) so please consider other factors that could contribute to his symptoms. I advise that he sees his doctor in order to investigate the matter further.

Reply
linda on Friday 07 October 2016 19:46
Reply to Marina Abdalla

I was taking lansoprazole for several months and suffered depression so switched back to losec which I find only causes very mild anxiety in morning. I have tried other meds for Gerd but this is the one with the least side effects for me.

Reply
Ray on Tuesday 03 January 2017 14:08

Lanso works much better than Ome for me. No question!

Reply
Melanie on Thursday 29 October 2015 11:07

I have taken Omeprazole on and off for the past 15 years and it has worked quite well along side food management. I try and manage reflux on as little medication as I can and have had times (when there's less stress) when I can do without it. However, over the past 8 months the reflux has been much worse and has resulted in 2 occasions when I aspirated - seriously scary. My medication has been changed to Lansoprazole in the last few days and seems to be working better, along side only eating very small portions and drinking lots of water. My questions are, (1) can you become resistant to omeprozole so that it no longer works? (2) or, is it possible that because of the years of suppression through using the drug, does your body over compensate and produce more acid? (3) If this is the case, does it make it difficult to actually get off this type of drug because your acid production has gone into overdrive?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Thursday 29 October 2015 12:25
Reply to Melanie

Hi Melanie,

Both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole have the same mechanism of action, and each work better depending on the individual.

In response to your questions, it is not possible to become resistant to the drug. Has your conditions worsened since changing the medication to Lansoprazole?

Your body will not overcompensate for the acid suppression, however, you will feel the effects of the acid production, if you come off the medication.

I hope this has been of some help to you!

Post edited by Marina Abdalla on 29/10/2015

Reply
Josh Jefferys on Thursday 05 November 2015 18:49

Hello, i am 21 years old and have been taking omeprazole for around 4 years now, i have a scope in july.

For ten days i could not take omeprazole, i didnt drink or eat anything other then bland plain food, but it flared up quite bad.

They didn't find anything when i had the scope, but since then when ever i drink coffee or alcohol my heartburn comes back. It seems like since having the scope omeprazole isn't really helping. Have you heard of this before? Thanks in advance

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 06 November 2015 14:29
Reply to Josh Jefferys

Dear Josh,

It is not uncommon for symptoms to be exacerbated after an endoscopy. Often it can cause slight discomfort and further indigestion in some individuals. However, I suggest that you consult your doctor for further advice if your omeprazole is no longer working for you in case any changes to your medication needs to be made.

Reply
Carol Tyler on Saturday 07 November 2015 14:54

Hi there. My husband has been taking large doses omer azole for about 6 months due to oesophagul reflux disease the symptoms of which make him feel very sick and nautious altho he never is. He is constantly taking gaviscon to try and stop the sick feeling but it won't go away. Do you think he should ask his dr if he can switch to lanzoperozole to see if this would work?

Thank you for your help

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Saturday 07 November 2015 15:17
Reply to Carol Tyler

Hi Carol,

Both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole have the same method of action, in reducing the level of acid secretion in the stomach. Depending on each individual, the effects of Omeprazole works better than Lansoprazole, and vice versa.

I would highly recommend to consult your doctor and see what they may suggest in prescribing Lansoprazole as an alternative. There shouldn't be a problem with this at all, and hopefully will ease some pain and discomfort that your husband is suffering from.

I hope this has been of some help to you!

Reply
Dan on Thursday 31 December 2015 22:36

If you're taking Omeprazole incorrectly then it won't work at all. The correct way to take it is in the morning before you eat anything and you can't eat anything for an hour after taking it. You do not take the medication when the acid is already flared up you take it in the morning before you eat or drink anything. Do not eat anything after taking the dosage until an hour after. If you do this correct method you will have no problems. I take it myself I find that its a whole lot better than Lansprazole. Lansprazole is weaker in my opinion

Reply
cb himself on Friday 18 December 2015 17:37

I have tried nexium, omeprasole and now lansaprazole. I have some "normal" dizziness from old age (i use a cane), but these meds seem to make my dizziness worse. which GERD med would be least like to cause increased dizziness?

Reply
Carol Chapman on Tuesday 19 July 2016 10:57

I have taken Omeprazole for a couple of years and it works well for me. However I am allergic to colour in meds and my pharmacy says it is unable to obtain any white in tablet or capsule form.Please could you possibly recommend manufacturers that still make white Omeprazole .

Thank you

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 19 July 2016 17:19
Reply to Carol Chapman

Hi Carol,

As far as I am aware, Bristol brand are still white tablets of Lansoprazole. You can ask your pharmacist to source these for you as a special request, however this is not guaranteed.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 19 July 2016 17:19
Reply to Carol Chapman

Hi Carol,

As far as I am aware, Bristol brand are still white tablets of Lansoprazole. You can ask your pharmacist to source these for you as a special request, however this is not guaranteed.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Philip hannam on Sunday 17 July 2016 12:27

Last November I got diognosed with a hyatis hernia and got given omeprazole 20mg one tablet a day. the dose then got upped to 2x 20mg in January. In June after being ill and the tablet not seeming to be working properly( been on omeprazole since 2004) they changed it to 30mg lanzoprazole which seemed to help but recently caused very watery poos and stomach cramps. Went back to the doctors he's dropped the doze to 15mg. Since then I have had dizzy spells and been throwing up anything I drink. Is this because the dose has been lowered and my body is used to a higher dose?

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 19 July 2016 17:23
Reply to Philip hannam

Hi Phillip,

Thank you for having a read of our blog. This may be the case, however, I would advise to consult with your doctor any side effects; and they may be able to recommend you an alternative medication, or discuss with you the side effects you may be suffering in more detail.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support Team.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Tuesday 19 July 2016 17:25
Reply to Philip hannam

Hi Phillip,

Thank you for having a read of our blog. This may be the case, however, I would advise to consult with your doctor any side effects; and they may be able to recommend you an alternative medication, or discuss with you the side effects you may be suffering in more detail.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support Team.

Reply
Bella Wilson on Thursday 21 January 2016 08:58

My husband was taking omeprazole for several years. In November 2015 he had a heart attack and whilst in hospital this mediaction was changed to lansoprazole. My question is, when his current prescription runs out, can he revert to taking the omeprazole, (of which we have loads indoors) or should he just get a new prescription? Many thanks

Reply
Mike Bedford on Wednesday 27 January 2016 12:00

I have been taking Lansoprazole for a few years now for a Gerd which causes my chest pain, 4 months ago I had a hypertensive crisis and my Lansoprazole was increased to 60mg a day from 30. Ever since the I have had a constant headache with pulsing temple pain and hot flashing pain in my head. I had a feeling this was to do with the increase in dose but my doc said it was coincidental. I stop taking it for a week the acid came back within days but the headaches and throbbing pain went. The doc still says its coincidental and to keep taking them so i started again on a lower dose and the pains have returned.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Wednesday 27 January 2016 12:16
Reply to Mike Bedford

Hello Mike,

Thanks for taking the time to read our article. It does seem as though Lansoprazole may be a cause of your headaches. You may consult with your doctor or an alternative doctor, to see if they may prescribe for you Omeprazole, to see if you still suffer from the same side effects or not.

As they both have the same method of action in the body, to help aid with acid re-flux, there shouldn't be much problem, swapping these medication for the other.

I hope this has been of some help to you.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Tasha on Wednesday 27 April 2016 21:37
Reply to Marina Abdalla

Hi, I'm new here and am not quite sure how to post a question so I'm replying to a comment. I've had the feeling of mucus at the back of my throat and regurgitation. I had an endoscopy yesterday and the esophagus, stomach, duodenum was normal, but the doctor prescribed omeprazole 40 mg daily. I'd already taken Prevacid OTC (about 1.5 weeks) and it did nothing for me. I'm wondering if there is any hope that the omeorzole will help me since they do the same thing. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Reply
Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 June 2016 17:57
Reply to Tasha

Hi Tasha,

Thank you for reading our blog! Omeprazole, although has the same mechanism of action to Prevacid (Lansoprazole) it is still a different drug and so it may work.

The dose indicated is for more severe cases and so the higher the dose may be more effective than Prevacid.

I hope this has been of come help to you.

Express Pharmacy Patient Support.

Reply
Lynn penick on Saturday 03 September 2016 14:31

I've been on omeprazole 2X day 20 mlg each I stopped about a week my Dr suggest I go back on due to mess my stomach is I have acid reflux,gastritis so bad when they did endoscopy said I had sores & bleeding on outside ,but yet said I didn't have ulcers and have bile so with all the kidney issues & renal failure I'm bearing I don't know what to do I've been on omeprazole over 6 yrs he also put me on ursodiol I also have severe osteoporosis I had more bone loss on my spine this density ! I take prelief don't know what to do about a ppi zantac doesn't agree with me gets me very shaky,and gaviscon liquid probably isn't. To replace ppis but any suggestions I'd appreciate

Reply
Nadire on Sunday 24 September 2017 06:17

Hi! I was getting lansoprazole for hiatus hernia. Last month my GP gave me omeprazole as well, because of the naproxen for my hip pain in my left leg and sciatica in my back and right leg. My pharmacist said no to take both of them. What can I do? It's so stressful to speak to the GP now. They have changed the service to a private companies and are only few doctors. It is impossible to see your doctor. Every time you have to go in the Gp you will find different doctor. One time they gave me medicine that could give me reactions to penicillin. If I didn't tell my pharmacist I could die that day. So I am asking you: can I get both omeprazole and lansoprazole during the day?

Reply
Antony Tolson on Thursday 03 November 2016 11:45

I was diagnosed with hiatus hernia 20 years ago and I was prescribed lanzoprasol , I am now 49 . A couple of years ago the doctor changed my meds to omeprazol , since the change and especially this year iv noticed a decrease in my overall health I get dizzy spells , lack of energy , depression , aching joints and pain in muscles , feeling sick and a constant pain in the chest area. I have had blood tests for everything and have all come back negative . Doctor has changed meds again back to lanzoprasol and is sending me for the endoscope. Let's hope there's an answer to all my symptoms or is it just the effects of the medication ?........

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John Mitchell on Monday 26 December 2016 11:46

I was diagnosed with a hiatus hernia and superficial ulceration to my stomach about 18 months ago after an endoscopy and was prescribed omeprazole. This cleared up the really bad gurgling pain and heartburn; however, I have developed really annoying and partially debilitating stomach cramps, mainly lower down. It sort of feels like I have badly strained my stomach muscles and I go a bit dizzy sometimes when bending over.

My doctor prescribed lansoprazole to see if it is the omeprazole that's causing the problem and it seems like it's very mildly better, but definitely still there. I was wondering if the muscle cramp feeling is a common symptom of GERD or if it could be related to PPIs. Any help or advice appreciated. Really good Blog by the way.

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Paul on Wednesday 22 February 2017 12:06

I Have been taking Lansoprazole for over 15 years now and have managed to get the dose down to 15mg every other day ( I did try every three days but the acid returned ). I am trying toi reduce the dose becuase since I have been on the drug long term I have problems with Tinitus, joint pain and impotency. The doctors just reckon this is co-incidental with getting older ( I am 64 ) but I do not. Any thoughts?

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janice on Tuesday 21 March 2017 08:07
Reply to Paul

The Health Hazards Of Omeprazole (Lansoprazole from the same group of drugs)

Omeprazole actually limits our body’s ability to absorb vitamin B12 when you consume it for an extensive period of time. The deficiency of this vitamin can lead to:

Depletion in our red blood cell count

Anemia

Depression

Anxiety

Neurological damage leading to degenerative ailments like dementia

It can cause damage to our central nervous system

Omeprazole causes rapid loss of calcium in our bodies which causes a condition known as osteoporosis or brittle bone syndrome, where a person is prone to broken bones or fractures easily

A calcium shortage can cause muscle issues

It causes an increased risk of respiratory issues, such as shortness of breath, wheezing, difficulty breathing, hyperventilation, and congestion

Chronic fatigue caused by low red blood cells which are responsible for conveying oxygen throughout our body

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Lisa Johal on Thursday 16 February 2017 09:25

Hi, I currently take Sulfasalzine and Hydrochloquine for RA, I have been prescribed Omeprazole in the past for acid reflux caused by another medication I was taking (Meloxicam). I have the odd bout of acid, but have used all of my Omeprazole. Can I take 15mg of Lansoprazole instead?

Thanks

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Linda on Monday 27 November 2017 09:00

I've been taking Omeprazole for a couple of months, prescribed for occasional severe pain when swallowing which my Dr diagnosed as acid reflux.

I am a life long non smoker generally very fit and now in my 60's but prone to chest infections. I recently have lost my voice twice and have a persistent cough which I can't throw off. I am optimistic that the dry cough will resolve but I'm worried about my voice. I don't get a sore throat . Could these things be attributed to Omeprazole ?

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Rajan KK on Saturday 25 February 2017 07:36

I have just been prescribed Omeprazole for 3 Months.

When do I take this, 30 minutes before food or 30 minutes after food. Kindly advise

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Ssuk on Thursday 27 April 2017 21:42

I had ulcer doctor gave me lansoprazole for 10 weeks and then opmperazole But I always have feeling of saliva or phlegm stuck in my throat it doesn't go away any suggestion

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Marina Abdalla on Friday 17 March 2017 11:08

Hi Rajan,

Thank you for reading our blog. It is recommended to take Omeprazole before eating, or as directed by your doctor.

I hope this helps.

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Linda on Sunday 19 March 2017 13:43

I have taken lansaprazole 30mgs for 3 years but also find I need Gaviscon and a wedge pillow at night. I recently had a terrible flare up of reflux and abdominal pain. A&E changed me to omeprazole 20 mgs as they said It was more effective plus ranitidine 300mg at night. After a week on the new regime my reflux is settling and excoriated throat is healing. Downside though is that it has caused me to have a slow heartbeat. When sitting quietly it's 36 beats per minute. No symptoms of feeling faint or dizzy. Is this the ranitidine, the omeprazole or the combination of both? Should I return to lansaprazole and Gaviscon as I was OK on these heart wise. Could you please advise? I eat a careful diet and am teetotal and caffeine free. Drink only water.

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Pam Logan on Saturday 18 March 2017 21:35

I have been taking Lanzoprazole for several years. Reading that Omeprazole is now causing problems with some people and they are saying that it is dangerous to take it long term, does Lanszoprazole have the same problems. I seem to be suffering with bouts of fatigue which could be some sort of deficiency.

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Viv Griffiths on Wednesday 28 June 2017 09:58

Hi,

Just been diagnosed with duodenitis and Gastritis plus ulceration. Already on omeprozole following a now cleared up bout of h pylori. Because of the newly complaints the doctor has changed me from 40mg omeprozole daily to 30mg lansoprozole daily. I am concerned because Imhave been told that 30mg lansoprozole is equivalent to 20mg omeprozole. Therefore My dosage is really halved thereby seemingly not enough. Can anyone advise please

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Marina Abdalla on Wednesday 12 July 2017 13:42
Reply to Viv Griffiths

Hi Viv,

Thank you for reading our blog. There is no data to indicate the equivalence between Omeprazole and Lansoprazole. Considering your new complaints, the GP would have outweighed the benefits over the risks and changed your treatment accordingly. You are currently taking the highest strength of Lansoprazole as it is available in 15mg and 30mg. If you find Lansoprazole is not relieving your symptoms, please consult with your GP and they will be able to amend the medication you are taking.

I hope this has helped in some way!

Express Pharmacy Patient Support Team.

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Caroline on Wednesday 31 May 2017 11:25

Hi, I have been on lansoprazole for about 10 years. A while ago my dose was increased due to terrible reflux which nearly choked me. So I've been taking one night and morning. I recently developed a non blanching rash on my feet and legs. Little blood spots which got bigger. I also had a nose bleed and would bleed badly at the slightest scratch. I was extremely breathless and very angsty at night with restless legs. I went to my gp who had bloods taken and I have to go back for more tomorrow. The first ones showed raised INR, ESR and anaemia. I take lansoprazole to protect my gut from RA drugs. I did some research myself and decided to stop the lansoprazole for a couple of days. The rash and breathlessness have reduced considerably and i feel much better in myself. I. Surprised my GP didn't pick up on it although I'm sure she was just making sure to cover all bases. I have to say it scared me and I'm surprised it's not monitored more. I am now suffering terribly with acid reflux and munching Rennes by the ton. Not good I know. Is there an alternative to this group of meds that I could try? It's very worrying as my mother died from oesophageal cancer and my brother has Barrett's oesophagus. Thanks. Caroline

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E. Dinnis on Friday 02 February 2018 13:07

in addition to G E R D I had stomach cramps=bloating and stool fragmentation. By experiment discovered I was intolerant to Lactose (dairy products) Now take non=lactose milk butter and cheese and all these symptoms have now gone. Would suggest a trial period of non lactose products might help these symptoms.

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Lesley Windeyer on Sunday 13 August 2017 14:53

Hi.. I've been taking Lansoprazole for a number of years now. For the past year i've started taking Tumeric Golden paste.. being tumeric, black pepper and coconut oil.I've recently read that Tumeric should not be taken with Lansoprazole. Is this correct? If so should I stop taking it? I usually have about a teaspoon morning and night. Thanks.

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Hayley on Wednesday 09 August 2017 17:25

Hi, I visited my GP when I experienced a few days of feeling like something was stuck in my throat, feeling gassy (not normal at all for me) and a general feeling of bloating, but high in my chest, not stomach. GP said it was gastritis as it occurred a day or so after I had eaten a hot (ish) curry. I was prescribed 30mg Lansoprazole (to take for 4 weeks) which did the trick for the first few days, but my symptoms are back again, even though I take the tablets daily, as instructed. I am a bit of a worrier so would really value your opinion. Thank you :-)

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caroline Meah on Monday 18 September 2017 10:12

I have been on omeprozle for 1 month and it is not doing anything for my heartburn which i have every day. GP originally put me on 20mg and then after 2 weeks upped it to 40mg twice daily. My chest hurts after eating anything and the pain radiates around to my back. I am eating small, regular meals and not eating any fat or drinking any alcohol. I have to take Gaviscon to alleviate the pain and am completely depressed with how i am feeling.

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Vic Murphy on Friday 30 March 2018 09:47

I had a heart attack 6 years ago and was fitted with 4 stents. I have been on medication ever since and I am fit and well. However, about 6 months ago as a result of passing some blood I was examined and a small stomachs ulcer was found. As of that moment I was put on Omeprazole 20mg. I have had no further symptoms and continue to be fit and well.

6 weeks ago the Pharmacist who was sitting in for the Doctor changed my Omperazole to Lansoprazole 30mg saying “they both do the same job” since then I have had very loose stools and loads of bubbly gas and it is quite frankly embarrassing as well as inconvenient.

A friend who is a nurse commented that the reason for the change is cost savings. Is that true? I’m feeling a bit like a guinea pig at the moment.

Btw a great blog thank you.

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Lin Bishop on Thursday 07 December 2017 01:36

Hi. I've been trying to come off Lansaprazole after 17 years. I'm coping on 15mg daily now but getting light pains in my upper left back. Any idea what this could be thx. I'm worried that lowering my ppi is causing some damage.

I've had gastroscopy January and had small amount of gastritis.

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Lin on Wednesday 06 December 2017 16:53

Hi

I've been taking Lansaprazole since 2000 and recently been reading about dangers of PPI's. Managed to reduce down to 15mg daily with no heartburn but been getting pain in my back on the left side. Not too much to take painkiller or anything but worried acid might be causing damage. Are Lansaprazole as dangerous as omeprazole thx.

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