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Emergency Contraception


11th September Marks the Beginning of Sexual Health Week 2017

Posted Monday 11 September 2017 09:45 by Tim Deakin in Emergency Contraception

Sexual Health Week 2017 is the perfect time to remind yourself of the emotional and physical aspects of sexual health, including online treatments for sexual health concerns

Sexual Health Week 2017 marks the 10th annual week dedicated to improving knowledge surrounding sexual health. It’s an event run by the FPA: the Family Planning Association. This is a UK registered sexual health charity dedicated to giving clear information and support on sexual health and relationships.

The theme of Sexual Health Week 2017 is: ‘Let’s Talk Porn’

Sexual Health Week 2017 will focus on the impact of pornography on people’s perception of sexual activity and sexual health. The FPA want to use the week to encourage open conversation about subjects related to pornography, such as consent, communication, safe sex, body image and the ability to distinguish between fantasy and reality.

Research has shown that young people are coming into contact with sexually explicit content at a much younger age, and more than half of 11 to 16 year old boys think that pornography is a realistic depiction of sex. The FPA want to use Sexual Health Week 2017 to promote open-minded, positive and non-judgemental discussion which addresses the fact that porn is made to look good, not feel good.

To achieve this, the FPA are offering useful information for young people, including quizzes to determine the differences between actual sexual intercourse and pornography. They’ll also be giving away top tips for parents, teachers and health professionals so that they can feel confident having the conversation about sexual health with young people.

So what can you do? You can get involved by shouting about Sexual Health Week 2017 on social media using the hashtag #SHW17, and by obtaining your free resource pack from the FPA site.

It’s important to be aware of the physical aspects of sexual health, as well as the emotional ones

The physical aspects of sexual health are just as important as the emotional or psychological aspects. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a huge concern for anyone practicing sexual intercourse without the proper safety measures in place. Conditions like chlamydia, genital warts and herpes are still common in the UK, with almost 500,000 cases of STIs being diagnosed each year in England alone.

There are other physical aspects of sexual health to consider however, such as unwanted pregnancy. This is a common concern for men and women practicing heterosexual sex without a condom. Other factors like erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation, which can both be signs of underlying health concerns.

Online treatments for sexual health

Maintaining your sexual health is hugely important, but many people find discussing their concerns with a GP nerve-wracking or even embarrassing. Part of the role of Sexual Health Week is to emphasise the importance of getting the right help and advice from professionals – remembering that sex is a part of life and should not be off limits in conversation.

For those who want to be able to ask questions in a discreet fashion and receive fast answers, why not utilise Express Pharmacy’s Live Chat tool? You can also find many online treatments for sexual health concerns on our website, which can be prescribed and despatched without needing to visit a doctor or pharmacy in person. These prescriptions include treatment for both erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. We also offer online treatments for sexual health in the form of emergency contraception, and even medication such as Norethisterone which can be used for period delay. Sexual Health Week 2017 is the perfect time to seek out the online treatments for sexual health you need, so don’t delay.

Get in touch with Express Pharmacy for fast treatment and reliable guidance on sexual health concerns

Seeking help for these kinds of concerns can be daunting, which is why Express Pharmacy offer discreet online treatments for sexual health. Contact us today via our Live Chat service, or by calling 0208 123 0703.


Busting the Myths Surrounding Emergency Contraception

Posted Tuesday 29 November 2016 13:53 by Tim Deakin in Emergency Contraception

emergency contraceptionThe issue with contraception and sex is that often they’re either not discussed or discussed in private, a reality that can make the facts surrounding both particularly blurry. As a result, you may not be armed with the information you need to keep safe. Emergency contraception, also known as the morning-after pill is not new to the market and yet there are a number of misconceptions and myths that can be problematic for women who need the correct information in order to help them make important decisions relating to birth control.

Levonelle and ellaOne are both forms of emergency contraception that can be taken retrospectively to prevent pregnancy. Levonelle must be taken within three days of unprotected sex and ellaOne within five days. While both prevent or delay the release of an egg, ellaOne is considered to be more effective than Levonelle.

Now, let us look in more detail at what emergency contraception does and does not offer women.

The morning after pill does not protect you from STIs

Contrary to popular belief, like many forms of hormonal contraception, the morning after pill doesn’t protect you from sexually transmitted infections (STIs). As a form of oral contraception, it works by releasing chemicals into the body, which affect the body’s natural response to fertilisation. As such, it cannot form a physical barrier that may also safeguard against sexually transmitted diseases or pelvic infections – as found with condoms and some forms of IUD (intrauterine device).

It does not cause abortion

While medication can be used to bring on abortion, emergency contraception works in a different way. Emergency contraception works by stopping the release of an egg and may also stop sperm from fertilising an egg that has already been released into the fallopian tubes. Levonelle contains levonorgestrel and ellaOne contains ulipristal acetate – which disrupts the natural hormone progesterone within a woman’s body. Progesterone is integral to the ovulation process and as a result, ovulation is prevented or delayed. For eggs that have already been fertilised and have implanted in the uterus, most forms of emergency contraception will have no effect.

Emergency contraception does not become less effective with more use

It is hard to pinpoint the exact number of pregnancies that have been prevented due to the use of Levonelle or ellaOne. However, research conducted in 2010 revealed that of the 1,696 women who received emergency hormonal contraception (EHC) within three days of unprotected sex, just 37 became pregnant. The same study showed that of the 203 women who took the morning after pill within three to five days of sex, three became pregnant. The rule of thumb is that the sooner you take EHCs after unprotected sex, the more effective they are likely to be.

Whilst neither Levonelle or ellaOne should be used as a method of regular contraception, both can be used more than once during any one menstrual cycle if necessary without diminishing effectiveness. It is important to note, that both EHCs do not offer continued protection and only prevent pregnancy after one act of unprotected sex. With Levonelle, your regular method of hormonal contraception will remain effective, however if you were to have sex after taking ellaOne you should use condoms as your normal contraception may not work as effectively as it should do.

It does not become less effective with alcohol

Alcohol or drug use does not make Levonelle or ellaOne any less effective. However, it is important to note that one of the primary side effect of excess alcohol consumption – vomiting – can impact on the effectiveness of oral contraceptives such as EHCs. If you vomit within two hours of taking emergency contraceptive Levonelle or within three hours with ellaOne, it is recommended that you seek medical advice where you will be either given another dose of your preferred EHC or fitted with an IUD.

Make sure you keep safe

In addition to offering trusted advice, Express Pharmacy can help you order the morning after pill discreetly. Simply select your treatment, complete our medical questionnaire and checkout to access a range of fast delivery options.


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