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Can Kegel Exercises Prevent Premature Ejaculation?

Posted Friday 26 April 2019 13:17 by in Premature Ejaculation by Tim Deakin

kegel for premature ejaculation

Premature ejaculation is the term used to describe a situation in which a man reaches climax too quickly during sexual intercourse. It’s the most common ejaculation problem in the UK[1] and estimates of how many men are impacted by premature ejaculation vary widely, ranging from just 5% to 31%.[2] This is largely due to the fact that it can be difficult to define how soon is too soon when it comes to reaching orgasm.

But one potential way to help treat the condition is with kegel exercises. We’re going to take a closer look at these exercises and determine whether they truly are the best way to tackle premature ejaculation.

What are kegel exercises and how can they help?

Kegel exercises are designed to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles, which can impact your sexual function and performance. Generally speaking, your pelvic floor muscles are the muscles on your thighs, buttocks and lower abdomen.

Common kegel exercises involve simply contracting these muscles, holding for five seconds and then relaxing them. Repeat this up to ten times, pausing in between for five seconds of relaxation. These are known as slow kegels.

Over time, you can start to increase the length of time you contract your muscles for. You can also move on to fast kegels, which involve the exact same movements but carried out at a faster speed. Good times to practice kegel exercises include when you wake up in the morning, after going to the toilet and before going to bed.

Pelvic floor rehabilitation such as kegel exercises have been shown to be an effective means of delaying premature ejaculation, as they help to strengthen the pubococcygeus muscle. One study found that, after 12 weeks of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation, 82.5% of participants had gained greater control of their ejaculatory reflex.[3]

Other ways to treat the condition

Although kegel exercises have proven to be an effective means of treatment for some premature ejaculation sufferers, their effectiveness has not been officially established and they are not guaranteed to prevent premature ejaculation in everybody.

Other treatment options include the “stop-start technique”, in which the male sex partner pauses sexual interaction or masturbation if they feel they are close to orgasm, and waits until the feeling passes before continuing.[4] If the sufferer is in a relationship, talking openly with your partner about your concerns and working around the issue together is highly recommended. Behavioural therapy is thought to help 60-90% of men with the condition, but it requires cooperation from both partners.[5]

What is the most effective way to tackle premature ejaculation?

Finding the right treatment for premature ejaculation depends largely on the individual case, and particularly what has caused the problem. If the issue is psychological, it may be that therapy is the best course of action. For many people, effective medication is the most dependable means of treatment.

Studies have revealed the effectiveness of medication options like Priligy. In one study, sexual satisfaction of participants increased from 50% at the beginning of the study to 80% at the end of the study, compared to 55% from participants using a placebo drug.[6]

Discover effective premature ejaculation treatment from Express Pharmacy by clicking here. For more information on the condition, get in touch with our team by calling 0208 123 07 03 or by using our discreet online Live Chat service.


[1] NHS UK. Ejaculation problems. 2016

[2] Sexual Advice Association. Ejaculation problems. 2016

[3] Pastore, AL. et al. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for patients with lifelong premature ejaculation: a novel therapeutic approach. 2014. Therapeutic Advances in Urology. 2014.

[4] NHS Lanarkshire. Sexual Difficulties: Premature Ejaculation. Lanarkshire Sexual Health. 2019

[5] Harvard Health Publishing. Premature Ejaculation. Harvard Medical School. 2017

[6] McCarty, EJ. And Dinsmore, WW. Dapoxetine: an evidence-based review of its effectiveness in treatment of premature ejaculation. Core Evidence. 2012


Can Premature Ejaculation Be Controlled?

Posted Sunday 21 April 2019 12:52 by in Premature Ejaculation by Tim Deakin

premature ejaculation medication

You may not always hear men admit it, but premature ejaculation is one of the most widespread sexual health concerns amongst males in the UK, along with erectile dysfunction. As many as one in three men suffer from premature ejaculation, although less than a quarter of men with the condition actually seek medical help for it.[1]

And because men find the condition difficult to talk about, it’s common for those suffering with premature ejaculation to feel completely alone and almost powerless. But this doesn’t have to be the case. We’re exploring the different means and methods involved in controlling this condition, from potential home remedies to psychological factors and effective medications.

Self-Help for premature ejaculation

There is no guaranteed way to determine how soon is too soon when it comes to ejaculation. This makes it difficult to define what we mean by premature ejaculation. Often, it comes down to sufferers of the condition finding a treatment which helps them last as long as they feel comfortable with, rather than aiming for a specific time.[2]

There are some simple precautions and measures you can undertake yourself at home which have shown signs of improving symptoms of premature ejaculation for some sufferers. These are listed as self-help treatments by the NHS[3] and include:

  • Using a thick condom in order to decrease the stimulation caused by intercourse
  • Taking a deep breath to briefly stop the ejaculatory reflex
  • Having sex with your partner on top, allowing them to pull away when you are close to climax
  • Masturbating oneto-two hours before engaging in sexual intercourse
  • Taking breaks during sex and thinking about other things to distract yourself

Treating the psychology of premature ejaculation

It’s common for psychological factors to be involved in many cases of premature ejaculation. Some health professionals believe that early sexual experiences can establish a pattern that becomes difficult to change, such as situations where climax had to be hurried in order to avoid being discovered.[4]

Factors like anxiety and relationship problems are also thought to make sexual conditions like premature ejaculation more likely to occur, so dealing with these wider issues through means such as couples’ therapy can often help to lessen symptoms. Often, premature ejaculation can increase symptoms of anxiety and depression, which can in turn make premature ejaculation even worse, creating a vicious cycle.[5]

Working together with your partner to prolong the sexual experience can be helpful, such as increasing foreplay or making use of the ‘start-stop’ technique.[6]

Premature ejaculation medication

Medical treatment for premature ejaculation is often found to be the most reliable and long-lasting of options for sufferers. These treatments can range from oral medication in the form of SSRIs to topical anaesthetic creams.

Priligy, or dapoxetine, is the first pharmacological treatment for premature ejaculation to be licensed in the UK. Results from clinical trials found that many more men reported that their symptoms were ‘better’ or ‘much better’ with Priligy than with a placebo drug.[7]

Safe and effective medication for premature ejaculation is available from Express Pharmacy. Discover Priligy and the topical cream Emla on our site today. If you have any further queries about your condition, don’t hesitate to get in touch by calling 0208 123 07 03 or by using our discreet online Live Chat service.


[1] The British Association of Urological Surgeons. Premature Ejaculation. 2019

[2] Waldinger, MD. Relevance of an evidence-based ejaculation time cut off point for neurobiological research of premature ejaculation. J.Comp. Neurol. 2005

[3] NHS UK. Can premature ejaculation be controlled? 2017

[4] Psychology Today. Premature Ejaculation: Causes and 10 Tips for Treatment. 2015

[5] Patrick, DL., Althof, SE., Pryor, JL. et al. Premature ejaculation: an observational study of men and their partners. J. Sex. Med. 2005.

[6] Cooper K., Martyn-St James M., Kaltenthaler, E. et al. Behavioural therapies for management of premature ejaculation: a systematic review. Sex. Med. 2015

[7] National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Premature ejaculation: dapoxetine. 2014


6 Myths About Premature Ejaculation

Posted Wednesday 31 October 2018 15:57 by in Premature Ejaculation by Tim Deakin

It’s the most common sexual condition affecting men, but how much do you really know about premature ejaculation?

Defined loosely as when a man ejaculates too quickly during sexual intercourse, premature ejaculation is the most common ejaculation problem for men. However, it can be difficult to define. This is because quite simply there is no cast-iron definition of how long sex should last, and it’s up to each individual man or couple to decide whether they are happy with the length of their intercourse. One study of 500 couples found that the average time taken to ejaculate was around five and a half minutes.

Premature ejaculation can be caused by a variety of factors, both physical and psychological. It could be the result of prostate problems, thyroid problems or the effects of recreational drugs. Likewise, it could be due to mental health concerns such as anxiety, depression, stress or problems within the relationship.

As such a vague condition, it can be difficult to really understand premature ejaculation. Thankfully, we’re here to help you bust some myths. Let’s take a look.

PERCEPTION: ‘Premature ejaculation sufferers are very anxious people’

REALITY: Not necessarily

Although anxiety can indeed be a factor in premature ejaculation, it is not a set rule that premature ejaculation sufferers also live with anxiety. In fact, one Belgian survey found that sufferers have the same average levels of anxiety as the wider population. This is because there is a distinction to be made between an anxiety disorder and sex-specific stress. The latter, just like any other stress, is something that can be worked on fairly smoothly by talking through issues with partners, trying different positions and not taking things too seriously.

PERCEPTION: ‘People with premature ejaculation experience it all the time’

REALITY: False

Premature ejaculation is more often than not a situational condition, meaning the circumstances surrounding intercourse have a significant part to play in the duration of a man’s performance. Studies show that when men feel more relaxed – usually with a long-term partner – they tend to perform for longer, while more casual relations can lead to increased feelings of stress and excitement which can bring on premature ejaculation. Likewise, life stressors like family issues or money troubles can also bring on the condition.

PERCEPTION: ‘Premature ejaculation is a young man’s problem’

REALITY: False

It’s widely thought that premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction exclusively affect men on opposite ends of the age-scale (i.e. young people suffer from PE and old people suffer from ED). In actual fact, premature ejaculation can strike at any age. One survey found that the rate of sufferers remains fairly steady at 25-30% from teens to age 50.

PERCEPTION: ‘Premature ejaculation is just as distressing for partners as it is for sufferers’

REALITY: Generally false

Men regularly project their premature ejaculation anxieties onto their partners, but research actually shows that partners don’t care as much as you might think. For women especially, the rate of orgasm in sex in general is only around 25%, with traditional methods often not doing enough to bring about climax on their own. Other methods are therefore welcomed by many women, and these don’t often need men to maintain an erection.

PERCEPTION: ‘If you can’t perform for an extended period of time, you have premature ejaculation’

REALITY: False

As we said earlier, premature ejaculation is hard to define. Consequently, this leads many men to assume they have it just because they can’t last for extended periods of time. The common consensus among health professionals is that being unable to perform for more than two minutes is an indicator of premature ejaculation. However, many men that last longer than this still assume they are sufferers.

PERCEPTION ‘There is effective treatment for premature ejaculation available’

REALITY: True!

For those who do indeed live with premature ejaculation, effective and safe treatment is available. Priligy and Emla are two proven treatments for the condition that can be prescribed by Express Pharmacy.

For more information on the premature ejaculation treatment available, contact the team of NHS-approved pharmacists at Express Pharmacy today. Call us on 0208 123 07 03 or get in touch via our discreet online Live Chat service.


Premature Ejaculation: The Facts and Figures You Need to Know

Posted Tuesday 20 February 2018 10:10 by in Premature Ejaculation by Tim Deakin

Studies show that men and women rate male sexual performance differently. Let’s clear the air on premature ejaculation

A study by Men’s Health asked men to rate their own sexual performance. The magazine then asked over a thousand women the same thing about their male partner. The results found that men are potentially more worried about conditions like premature ejaculation than they need to be.

According to the survey:

- Just 23% of men feel they always last long enough during sexual intercourse
- 52% of men feel they usually last long enough
- 20% of men said they sometimes experience difficulties with lasting long enough
- 5% of men feel they rarely last as long as they want to during sex

However, the same survey found these responses from women:

- 38% say their partner always lasts long enough
- 43% say their partner lasts long enough most of the time
- 13% say their partner finds it difficult to last long enough
- 6.5% say their partner rarely lasts long enough
- Only 22% claim that how long their man lasts is their main complaint.

The most common complaint was that men spend too little time engaging in foreplay

These results show that, in general, men were much more critical of their own sexual performance time than their female partners. In some ways this isn’t surprising, as there is no firm definition of how long sexual intercourse should last and therefore no exact definition for premature ejaculation.

Premature ejaculation is generally defined as a man reaching climax too quickly, often with little stimulation necessary. It is the most common ejaculation problem. In a study of 500 couples from five different countries, the average length of sexual intercourse was around five-and-a-half minutes, and most medical professionals define premature ejaculation as reaching climax within two minutes or less.

Understanding and treating premature ejaculation

Premature ejaculation is something most men will experience at least once in their lifetime, but around 20-30% of men are thought to experience the condition regularly. Sadly, many men suffer in silence due to embarrassment.

There are wide variety of factors which can increase your risk of experiencing premature ejaculation. Common physical causes of premature ejaculation include prostate problems and thyroid problems — such as an overactive or underactive thyroid gland — and factors like high blood pressure, diabetes and spinal injury. Lifestyle factors can also play a part, such as excessive alcohol consumption, recreational drug use and smoking.

The cause can be also psychological, caused by factors such as stress, anxiety, guilt, nervousness, depression and relationship problems. It can also be the result of underlying trauma.

Because of this, it’s important to include your partner in your concerns as much as possible. Some men find that simply discussing their symptoms with their partner (or attending sessions such as couples therapy) can have a positive effect on their premature ejaculation symptoms. It also allows you to discuss new sexual possibilities with your partner which might help increase the length of your performance.

If you’re guilty of any of the potential lifestyle causes, it can also be beneficial to practice healthier daily habits. These might include cutting down on smoking and drinking, as well as stopping the use of any recreational drugs.

It is also possible to treat premature ejaculation with safe and effective medication. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to treat depression, but they can also help to delay ejaculation. Priligy is one effective example of an SSRI which can be used to treat premature ejaculation by stopping the ejaculatory expulsion reflex from reaching your brain too quickly. It has been found to potentially increase sexual performance time by 200 to 300%.

Priligy is currently available from Express Pharmacy alongside a range of other sexual health treatments. If you have concern but are not sure what to do about it, why not call the team on 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet live chat service.

Comments

Himanshu Vats on Friday 06 April 2018 01:04

How premature ejaculation can be cure permanently. I’m 26 now and had girlfriend we are in serious relationships hopefully going to get married next year. My girlfriend is not a fan of me consuming these tablets and its bothers me because she never say but i can see on her face about my problem of premature ejaculation.

Reply
on Thursday 17 May 2018 11:49
Reply to Himanshu Vats

Dear Himanshu,

Thanks for reading our blog. Unfortunately, there isn't a long term cure for premature ejaculation, however there are several different lifestyle factors that you can implement, daily to reduce the symptoms. Eg. cutting the consumption of alcohol and stop smoking.

There is also a topical cream called EMLA, which is a local anaestheic, that can be applied, to prolong sexual activity. This is an off-licence treatment available on our website.

You may read more about EMLA cream via the following link - https://www.expresspharmacy.co.uk/treatment/pe/emla

I hope this has been of some help to you.

Reply
Aidan Ruane on Wednesday 05 September 2018 22:34

How often do you need to take the tablets or is it only before having foreplay and sex.

Aid

Reply
Tags: Priligy Erectile Dysfunction General Health Men's Health Premature Ejaculation Sexual Health

How You Can Ensure a Night to Remember Rather Than a Nightmare to Forget

Posted Monday 09 February 2015 16:40 by in Premature Ejaculation by Tim Deakin

premature ejaculationBurdened with fears of premature ejaculation? Being open, honest and ready to explore the solutions could help to ensure your dates are memorable . . . for all the right reasons.

From first dates to long-term relationships, men can still be hampered by a fear of premature ejaculation. Although a common concern – and a relatively minor issue – men are generally afraid to discuss it, let alone seek effective treatment that can help them to perform as they would wish.

It has been estimated that over three-quarters of men will experience premature ejaculation (PE) at some point in their lives and nearly 20% of men aged 18-59 suffer from it regularly. Even men with a long-term partner who regularly have intercourse can find premature ejaculation – or perceived premature ejaculation – to become an issue at some point in their lives.

While sexual intercourse plays an important role in a healthy relationship, the majority of women agree that occasional problems with premature ejaculation have little bearing on their enjoyment of sex or their attraction to their partner. Nevertheless the fear of PE remains for many men – and it is this fear that frequently exacerbates the issue.

The two types of Premature Ejaculation

We can typically break down premature ejaculation into two categories: primary and secondary. They can be distinguished as follows:

Primary

A male who has suffered problems with PE for as long as they have been sexually active, most commonly attributed to deep-lying psychological factors such as upbringing, conditioning, biological factors or even a traumatic sexual experience.

Secondary

A male who has no previous history of PE but can be afflicted by the issue due to physical or psychological triggers such as diabetes, high blood pressure, stress, depression or even a developing fear of sexual performance.

Communication is key

Communication is crucial to finding a solution to issues of premature ejaculation, but men are notoriously shy, embarrassed or just reluctant to discuss personal issues relating to sexual health. Ignoring the issue can cause premature ejaculation to become a long-term problem, whilst a more open approach and willingness to talk with your partner and/or doctor can help to alleviate the issue or lead to the prescribing of effective medication.

Methods and medication

Basic techniques for handling premature ejaculation include breathing techniques, the ‘start-stop’ and ‘squeeze’ techniques or using ‘climax-controlling’ condoms aimed at desensitising the experience.

In more persistent cases, Priligy tablets are a proven and commonly effective medication for treating premature ejaculation. They contain dapoxetine, an active ingredient that increases the time it takes to ejaculate. It also enables more control over ejaculating –alleviating much frustration and anxiety.

Accessing Priligy is discreet, fast and safe through Express Pharmacy, and can be done through an online consultation procedure. If you suffer from PE and want to access premature ejaculation medication, don’t let embarrassment get in the way any longer.


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