• Call
  • 0208 123 0703

Weight Loss


What More Can We Do for Mental Health?

Posted Wednesday 18 April 2018 10:41 by Tim Deakin in Weight loss

Research shows that there is still a long way to go when it comes to mental health awareness and support...

A recent survey by ADP UK has found that UK employers are showing a lack of interest in their employees’ mental wellbeing despite the fact that many employees are suffering from significant mental health concerns.

The study, which assessed 1,300 workers, revealed that almost a third of British workers (31%) feel that their employer has little to no interest in their mental health. Despite this, a fifth (20%) of employees feel stressed out on a daily basis, and a third (33%) are even considering seeking new employment because the pressure is so bad.

Managing Director of ADP UK, Jeff Phipps, says:

“A certain level of stress is natural, even healthy, in the workplace, but it’s important that it doesn’t get out of hand. Employees who endure consistently high levels of stress are in danger of suffering from anxiety and even burnout. This can lead to more serious mental health issues.”

It seems mental health is worst among younger employees, as 22% of workers under 35 say they experience stress every day. 42% say it’s so bad they are considering a different job.

In a separate survey exploring mental health, one in six UK adults said they had experienced some kind of neurotic health problem in the last seven days, with anxiety and depression being the most common disorders. What’s more, a recent Psychiatric Morbidity Survey reveals that there are around 3 million people in the UK living with anxiety, and a further 3 million living with depression.

Not only are these concerns common, they are also serious. A study by the World Health Organisation (WHO) compared the effects of depression to those of physical conditions like arthritis, asthma, angina and diabetes. They concluded that the effect of depression on a person’s ability to function was up to 50% more serious than those of all four physical conditions combined.

What more can we do?

Understanding mental health conditions is the first step to dealing with them effectively. ADP UK suggest that employers take the time to research the symptoms and signs of conditions like anxiety and depression in order to put the necessary initiatives in place. Jeff Phipps states that this can be both a moral course of action and a smart business investment.

“Stress and mental health issues are one of the main causes of employee absence and staff turnover, which means supporting employees isn’t just the right thing to do — it’s also a worthwhile investment […]

“Employee assistance programmes and occupational health services are also imperative in creating a safe location where employees can go in confidence If they’re facing an issue.”

Mental health can have physical consequences

Mental health conditions like anxiety and depression can be difficult to spot because, often, the effects cannot be seen. However, both depression and anxiety can lead to physical symptoms.

Mental health disorders like depression often result in sufferers feeling constantly tired, as sleep quality can become poor. This may lead sufferers to take comfort in unhealthy habits like overeating, smoking and a lack of physical exercise. Sometimes anxiety and depression also lead to low sex drive and, in men, conditions like erectile dysfunction become more common. This can lead to a vicious cycle in which the mental symptoms worsen due to growing concern over physical symptoms.

For healthcare information, treatment and support about a range of health conditions, including smoking, weight gain and erectile dysfunction, contact Express Pharmacy today. Call our team on 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet Live Chat service.


Eating Disorders Under the Microscope

Posted Monday 26 February 2018 09:15 by Tim Deakin in Weight loss

In the UK alone, there are over 1.6 million people estimated to be directly affected by an eating disorder. Of this 1.6 million, 11% are male and 89% are female, and 14-25 year olds are the group most affected by eating disorders.

Conditions like anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are common and serious issues in the UK.

On average, 149 weeks go by before someone experiencing symptoms of an eating disorder seeks help. This equates to almost three years, 37 months or 1,043 days during which they suffer in silence.

There are up to 18 new cases of bulimia per 100,000 people every year in the UK, and around 1 in 100 women aged between 15 and 30 is affected by anorexia.

Anorexia & Bulimia

Although both conditions are more common in young women, anorexia and bulimia can affect men and women of any age. Anorexia usually involves sufferers trying to keep their weight as low as possible by not eating enough food or by exercising too much. Bulimia sufferers tend to go through periods of eating a lot of food in a short amount of time and then forcing themselves to be sick, use laxatives or do excessive exercise (or a combination of all three) in an effort to stop themselves gaining weight.

Both of these conditions can be recognised by severe weight loss, fear of putting on weight and being very critical of weight and body shape — to the point where sufferers believe they are overweight despite being a healthy weight or underweight. Both disorders are also often accompanied by mood changes, including feeling very tense, tired, anxious and acting secretively.

Sufferers may miss meals or avoid certain foods they see as fattening, and will often have an unusually low Body Mass Index (BMI) and/or be smaller and thinner than expected for their age. They may resort to medications to fuel their condition.

Both anorexia and bulimia can manifest themselves in a variety of physical conditions, and not just through a loss of weight. Sufferers may also experience dry skin, dizziness or even hair loss. Some sufferers of anorexia can even experience unwanted facial hair.

Migraines are also common in individuals with eating disorders. One study by Neurology Reviews found that 84% of participants with anorexia suffered migraines, as did 74% of bulimia sufferers.

Find out more about effective migraine treatment from Express Pharmacy.

Recovery

Recovery from an eating disorder can be a difficult and long process, and is sometimes something sufferers must battle for the rest of their lives. It’s hugely important that if you suspect you may be experiencing eating disorder symptoms, you consult your GP as soon as possible. From there, you’ll be given help and support. Your GP will ask you questions about your eating habits and overall wellbeing and they will be able to refer you to a specialist who can help you with a tailored treatment plan and therapy program.

For help, support and treatment for a variety of health concerns, contact Express Pharmacy. Call the team today on 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet live chat service.

Related Categories:

Ready to Ditch Your New Year’s Resolution. Read This!

Posted Monday 29 January 2018 16:35 by Tim Deakin in Weight loss

Don’t be a six-week dropout: how to stick to the new leaf you turned over in January

It’s the end of January, which means many of us have spent the past couple of weeks struggling to keep the promises we made to ourselves in the tail end of 2017. New Year’s resolutions have become something of a rite of passage in the UK.

Of course, New Year’s resolutions sound like a fantastic idea on the 31st of December. But by the final days of January, many of us find ourselves ready to throw in the towel and cast aside the goals we set with good intentions.

So why is it that so many of us can’t seem to keep our New Year promises for more than six weeks, and how can we make more of a success of our resolutions?

The answer lies in long-term, lifestyle changes.

What are the most popular New Year’s resolutions?

Statistically speaking, the top ten New Year’s resolutions are:

- Exercise more (38%)

- Lose weight (33%)

- Eat more healthily (32%)

- Take a more active approach to health (15%)

- Learn new skill or hobby (15%)

- Spend more time on personal wellbeing (12%)

- Spend more time with family and friends (12%)

- Drink less alcohol (12%)

- Stop smoking (9%)

- Other (1%)

As you can see, the most popular New Year’s resolutions are, by far, those which focus on improving our health and wellbeing, with exercising, losing weight and eating healthier dominating our New Year promises. Other health factors like drinking less and quitting smoking are also shared by around one in ten UK adults.

How many of us make resolutions, and how many of us actually stick to them?

Over a third of us in the UK make a New Year’s resolution at the start of January. Sadly however, not many of us manage to see them through.

NHS figures suggest that only one in ten New Year’s resolutions are completed successfully, whilst Bupa states that 43% of resolutions last less than a month, 66% last one month or less, and 80% don’t make it to the end of March.

This leaves us questioning why it is that two thirds of us can’t seem to follow through with our health goals for more than six weeks.

How do you make sure you persevere with your resolution?

It’s often the case that people who strive to be healthier in the coming year are responding directly to their own overindulgence and potential weight gain over the festive period. Why does this matter? Because it suggests that they are looking for a ‘quick fix’ to reverse the effects of Christmas, rather than a genuine lifestyle change.

It takes an average of 66 days — over two months — to fully learn a new behaviour, meaning many people who strive to hit the gym more frequently or consume healthier meals give up before their body and mind have fully adjusted to the change.

A New Year’s resolution, particularly one relating to your health, should be seen as a long-term change in your behaviour which you can implement into your daily life. Professor Wiseman, of the University of Hertfordshire, suggests only making one resolution and breaking it up into a series of smaller steps you can achieve over time.

There’s nothing wrong with safe medical support

There is no cheating when it comes to long-term health improvements. Whether you want to give up a bad habit or simply lose weight and improve your fitness, NHS-approved medication can help you reach your goal.

Champix is a tried and tested medicine that can help increase your chances of stopping smoking for good. You can also look to weight loss treatments like Xenical and the innovative Mysimba if you’re trying to get healthier in 2018. All of these treatments (and more) are available from Express Pharmacy.

For reliable, NHS approved support contact the team at Express Pharmacy. We can help make 2018 the year you make those long-term changes for the better. Simply call 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet live chat service.

Related Categories: Stop Smoking

What Are the Early Signs of Heart Disease in Men?

Posted Monday 15 January 2018 16:24 by Tim Deakin in Weight loss

New research shines a light on the possible warning signs of cardiovascular disease in men

Heart disease is a leading cause of death across the globe. In the UK, around 70,000 people die from coronary heart disease (CHD) every year, which equates to an average of 190 people each day or one death every eight minutes.

And CHD is a bigger killer in men than it is in women. On average, one in seven men in the UK dies from CHD, compared to one in eleven women.

Now recent research has been carried out to try and help men spot the early warning signs of CHD before it’s too late. The research, undertaken by Baptist Health in South Florida, is said to be particularly important for younger men who are less likely to be assessed for heart disease.

The study found that erectile dysfunction could be a sign of CHD

The researchers involved carried out a review of 26 previous studies which explored the potential link between CHD and erectile dysfunction. Their results suggested that impaired blood flow may be the reason behind the link.

The research identified a strong connection between erectile dysfunction and reduced endothelial function. This refers to blood vessels being unable to fully dilate, and therefore being unable to allow blood to flow effectively.

Endothelial dysfunction is an early sign of atherosclerosis, which occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries, increasing your risk of heart disease and stroke. What’s more, the research found that erectile dysfunction was also linked with an increase in carotid intimal medial thickness (CIMT). This is when there is plaque build up in the walls of the arteries supplying blood to the head.

Researchers stated that “these relationships remained consistent within age, study quality, methods of assessing ED, and publication year subgroups.”

Although over 60% of men over 60 suffer with erectile concerns, researchers noted that this link between erectile dysfunction and CHD will be particularly important for younger men, as they are less likely to undergo regular health checks and the onset of impotence may be an important indicator.

Earlier research also discovered the link between erectile dysfunction and heart disease

Research undertaken earlier in 2017 also found that men who are at risk of heart disease are more likely to develop erectile dysfunction. Results from researchers at Northwestern University found that all men who are at high risk of heart disease experienced erectile dysfunction, compared to just 15% of men who are at low risk of heart disease.

The author of the study, Dr Abbie Lane-Cordova, said: “We knew that erectile dysfunction was considered an early indicator of vascular disease that might occur before heart disease was diagnosed by a doctor.

“The study showed that men who were less likely to have risk factors for heart disease and had healthier behaviours (non-smoking, physically active, healthier diet) were also less likely to have erectile dysfunction later in life.

“Men may avoid erectile dysfunction the same way they may avoid heart disease.”

Those suffering from erectile dysfunction should consult a health professional, not least because Express Pharmacy can offer effective, discreet medication to tackle the issue, but also because raising awareness of your ED greatly increases the chances of identifying any potential heart problems earlier.

Weight is another CHD factor among men

Recent research found that slim people can also find themselves at risk of CHD, as half of the non-smoking middle aged people of normal weight who were tested were found to have diabetes or clogged arteries.

This is largely due to the fact that people who aren’t overweight are often less aware of how much saturated fat they are consuming, leading to high levels of LDL cholesterol.

However, being overweight remains a significant factor in increasing your risk of CHD. The researchers from Northwestern University identified seven key risk factors for heart disease. These are: high blood pressure, high blood sugar, elevated cholesterol, insufficient physical activity, smoking, poor diet and being overweight or obese.

You can get effective and safe weight loss medication from Express Pharmacy, including Xenical and Mysimba.

For further advice, information and medication to help you get healthier in 2018, contact the team at Express Pharmacy today. Simply call us on 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet Live Chat service.

Related Products: Xenical Mysimba
Related Categories: Acid Reflux

Are You Ready for National Obesity Awareness Week 2018

Posted Thursday 04 January 2018 15:52 by Tim Deakin in Weight loss

As the new year gets underway, there’s never been a better time to make a sustainable improvement to your diet

This January, from the 8th to the 14th, UK adults are encouraged to tackle obesity head on and improve their overall health for good. That’s because it’s National Obesity Awareness Week 2018.

Whether it’s by cooking healthier meals, avoiding snacking throughout the day, or making the effort to be a little more physically active, this is your chance to get healthy and stay healthy. If your New Year’s resolution was to lose weight and get healthy, this is the perfect opportunity to really get started.

Why is National Obesity Awareness Week so important?

Simply put, obesity awareness is important because obesity and weight problems are a growing problem in the UK. Britain is the most obese country in Europe, and rates have been steadily climbing for several years. In 2014, 62% of UK adults were classed as obese, compared to 53% 20 years earlier.

Nowadays, more than two thirds of men and almost 6 in 10 women are overweight or obese in the UK. Raising awareness of the dangers of weight issues can help us as a society to get to grips with this epidemic and begin to reverse the trend.

A large part of this is understanding the difference between short term weight loss solutions and long term lifestyle changes. Extreme diets may offer weight loss benefits in the short term, but making permanent changes to your lifestyle through diet and physical activity are the only way to ensure the long term health benefits associated with weight loss. Part of this comes from better understanding the food we eat and how the body handles them.

Take a second glance at your food shop this National Obesity Awareness Week

We all know about the negative effects of excessive consumption when it comes to food items like sugars. But when it comes to our weekly food shop most of us aren’t fully aware of the contents of regular food items like cereals and so-called “diet” options. For example, yoghurt is often marketed as a health food, and in cases of natural yoghurt products can be extremely good for you. However, some yoghurt brands, including ones aimed at children and “low-fat” options often contain large amounts of added sugar.

Cereal bars are often marketed as a healthy alternative to chocolates and sweets. And while there may be more nutritional value to these items it is important that you read the ingredients carefully and are not simply drawn in by fancy packaging. Many cereal bars contain corn syrup, sugar cane fibre and fructose among others, transforming your seemingly healthy snack into a particularly unhealthy option.

Examples such as these reflect the importance of obesity awareness, as it’s vital that we understand the ingredients in the foods we’re consuming so we know what to look out for, and what to avoid. That’s why taking part in National Obesity Awareness Week can not only benefit your own health, but increase awareness for others too.

Understanding how to choose the very best items for your shopping basket is a good start to developing a healthier diet. It is important to prepare your own food and drinks where possible to ensure you know precisely what you are ingesting each time you sit down to a meal.

If you are looking to make changes to your lifestyle that you can maintain for longer than 6 weeks, consulting your GP or pharmacist is a great starting point. For those who are struggling to achieve changes in their weight through diet and exercise, Express Pharmacy offers two proven medications, Xenical and Mysimba, which can help individuals to improve their health in conjunction with other lifestyle changes.

Contact the team at Express Pharmacy today by calling 0208 123 07 03 or by using our discreet live chat service.

Related Products: Xenical Mysimba
Related Categories: Acid Reflux