mountain climbing medication

From the right climbing gear to the correct medical supplies, here’s everything you need to know about staying safe while mountaineering

Unlike beach holidays, climbing holidays are often physically demanding as well as enjoyable. Reaching a stunning peak makes all the hard work worth it, but it’s important not to forget about your health and safety when experiencing such extreme environments.

The right gear and careful planning are imperative, as is protection against altitude sickness, which describes a number of conditions that may occur after you have ascended rapidly into a high altitude area.[1]

With that in mind, here are our golden rules for staying safe on your climbing holiday.

Bring the correct gear

It’s important to remember that, while fun, mountaineering also carries many risks. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) reports that there are around 4,000 annual rock climbing accidents, and 1,000 accidents per 100 hours of hill walking.[2]

The correct gear is essential if you want to enjoy your experience safely. As well as the climbing equipment itself, you’ll also need sun protection such as sunglasses, facemasks or balaclavas and a sunscreen which protects against UVA, UVB and UVC rays. You’ll also need cold protection gear such as cold climate clothing, gloves, hats, socks and boots.

Take your time and plan ahead

mountaineering safetyA landmark study on Scottish Mountaineering Incidents by Dr Bob Sharp found that there is a gender difference in the likelihood of experiencing a mountaineering accident. Men, and particularly younger men, are around 8 times more likely to experience a fatal injury. Sharp’s study found that the most common causes of accidents are poor navigation (23%), bad planning (18%) and inadequate equipment (11%).[3]

No matter how big or small, any mountaineering expedition requires careful planning. You need to know exactly where you’re heading and how to get there, sticking to a clear path you’ve already established. If you’re travelling in a group (which is recommended), you’ll need measures in place in case somebody gets lost or injured.

Avoid altitude sickness

Altitude sickness is arguably the most common health risk associated with mountaineering and climbing. It can range from mild to severe or even fatal, as it includes acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE).

According to the Himalayan Database, death tolls rise as the altitude increases. Peaks in Nepal with heights between 6,500m and 6,999m have a mortality rate of 0.65%. In peaks over 8,000m, this rises to 2.11%.[4]

This theory is backed up by the NHS’s Fit For Travel, which says that the risk of altitude sickness can rise up to 25% at 2,500m, and up to 75% at heights greater than 4,500m.[5]

Risk factors for altitude sickness can include the rate at which you ascend, the change in altitude itself and the sleeping altitude. It can also be made more likely if you have a history of altitude sickness or an existing cardiovascular disease, though general physical fitness does not protect against it.[6]

In order to tackle altitude sickness effectively, you’ll need to take things slow. Stay hydrated and well-rested, and make sure you bring the necessary medication with you to protect against the condition.

Find safe and effective medication for altitude sickness right here at Express Pharmacy. You can order Acetazolamide from our site and have it delivered to you easily and quickly. If you have any further queries about your health and safety, contact our team. Simply call 0208 123 07 03 or use our discreet online Live Chat service.