Sure, you quit smoking to improve your health, but did you ever think of all of the other reasons there are to quit the habit.

Smoking not only affects you, it affects your friends, family, in fact, it affects everyone around you – not to mention your ever-dwindling bank balance.

Consider these other inspiring reasons to stub out the habit.

Your Children – Exposing your children to second hand smoke can cause all sorts of health problems for them. Research has shown that second hand smoke is linked to asthma, pneumonia, heart disease, cancer and even sudden infant death syndrome.

Eighty per cent of second hand smoke is invisible, so even if you think you’re a safe distance away from your children, you’re probably not. The only way to completely protect them is to quit.

Your Family – You may not be aware, but smoking affects your family in other ways than just breathing your second hand smoke. Money problems, health worries and being able to spend quality time with them are all reasons to consider quitting.

By stopping smoking, you can free up extra cash to enjoy time with your family and give them peace of mind that you’re taking the necessary steps in order to be there for them in the future.

For your Baby – Smoking while pregnant can cause an abundance of health risks and complications to both mother and baby. Breathing problems, birth defects and premature labour are all reasons to get help to quit.

The chemicals from smoking can restrict the oxygen supply to your baby, forcing their tiny heart to beat harder every time you smoke.

However, if you choose to stop smoking during your pregnancy, you can eliminate the risks cigarette smoke causes, meaning you are more likely to have a healthier pregnancy and birth. Even if you are already into your third trimester, your baby can still benefit if you stop now.

Your Bank Balance – With the cost of cigarettes increasing by an average of six per cent every year, it’s definitely time to consider quitting.

Take a look at how much you could save:

cost of smoking

Smoking and the Law

After extensive research showed the harmful effects second hand smoke can have on children, the law now says it is illegal to smoke in a vehicle carrying anyone under the age of 18, across England and Wales, regardless of whether or not the sunroof or windows are open.

An experiment was carried out by the BBC to determine the extent of damage that second-hand smoke has on children. A particle monitor was placed in the back seat of a car to detect the levels of smoke a child would breathe in if someone was smoking inside the vehicle. It found that with the windows shut, they are exposed to levels of toxic smoke that are more than 235 times the safe level.

The research also showed that even with the windows open, the exposure is still over 100 times the recommended safe level of dangerous toxins.

The law was introduced to protect children and young people from the dangers of second-hand smoke – some of which can even be fatal. Failure to comply with new regulations could see both the driver and smoker receiving a £50 fine. If prosecuted by court the maximum fine could be £200.

In the UK, smoking legislation is being introduced all the time.

The government started introducing smoking legislation as far back as 1965, when it became illegal to advertise cigarettes on television. Across the years, more anti-smoking legislation has been introduced across the UK, with smoking banned on London Tube trains in 1984, and the ban of cigarette promotion and sponsorship in 2002.

Back in 2007, it became illegal to smoke in all public enclosed areas and workplaces. The ban was a success, seeing a staggering 400,000 people quit smoking.

It is only a matter of time before smoking restrictions close in even further - with a view to it one day being eradicated completely. So this is the perfect time to give up, and begin taking your life back.

Take on the same attitude as the law, and stop smoking this Stoptober. Contact us today on 0208 123 0703.

Every time a child breathes in second-hand smoke, they breathe in thousands of poisonous chemicals, putting them at risk of serious conditions including meningitis, cancer, bronchitis and pneumonia.