brain fogWe all have the odd bad day but what if losing your train of thought or suffering from poor memory becomes part of everyday life? For those who suffer from brain fog, these undesirable symptoms are a harsh reality.

In this article we take a look at the causes of brain fog and reveal just some of the steps that are recommended to help lift the haze.

What exactly is brain fog?

Brain fog is known by many names, from the clouding of consciousness to brain fatigue, and can be experienced in mild to severe episodes by individuals of all ages and from all walks of life.

For most, the effects of brain fog come on suddenly with no warning. They can make the management of symptoms particularly difficult. Lack of focus, poor short term memory, reduced mental sharpness and difficulty organising thoughts or finding words are just some of the symptoms associated with brain fog. Where symptoms aren’t addressed or appropriately managed the effects of brain fog can influence sufferers’ personal and professional lives in the long term.

The causes of brain fog

There are a number of triggers that can bring on episodes of brain fog. In an age of digital overload, your lifestyle can play a major role in just how severely symptoms strike and how often. The stress and anxiety that often goes hand-in-hand with modern day life is a primary cause of brain fog. In addition to this, nutritional deficiencies and dehydration have been proven to cause disturbances in the brain. Good brain function relies on the consumption of foods containing magnesium, vitamin B12 and amino acids, and if your body is deficient in these nutrients or dehydrated in general, then brain fog is likely to occur. Lack of sleep can also result in brain fog symptoms.

As well as everyday lifestyle factors, there are certain stages of life where you are more susceptible to the effects of brain fog. If you are undergoing chemotherapy, memory loss can be a common side effect, however this is usually a short term issue. For women experiencing the menopause, pregnancy or a particularly heavy period, hormonal changes can influence your memory and concentration.

Stress and depression is also commonly associated with brain fog – whether it is mental fatigue caused by work or a lack of sleep, or depression caused by an issue such as weight concerns.

How can I relieve symptoms?

Regardless of the cause of your brain fog, there are several steps that you can take to relieve symptoms and actively improve your memory. Drinking more water and making positive changes to your diet is a great place to begin. Focus on eating a brain-function-boosting diet by incorporating foods that are rich in Omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids, magnesium, complex B vitamins, and antioxidants. People who smoke or consume high levels of alcohol have also been proven to be at greater risk of brain fog, so take steps to limit intake.