vaccinations

Heading off to a foreign destination can be both an exciting and daunting experience. While so much adventure lies ahead, it is perfectly normal to feel overwhelmed by all of the preparation which needs to take place before you jet off. However, once everything is set and ready to go, you get to reap all of the benefits that come from travelling, without a single worry in the world!

Unfortunately, heading off abroad means that your body may become victim to some nasty diseases. These diseases are likely to leave you feeling very unwell and may even mean you have to cut your travels short. Although a scary thought, these diseases are simple to avoid, thanks to vaccinations.

Vaccines Needed Around The World

You won’t need to get a vaccination for every country you travel to, but it’s worth checking what is recommended in your specific location before it’s too late. To make things easier for you, you can use the map below to establish whether the country you are travelling to is at high risk of disease.

As you can see, places residing in South Asia and Africa are at the highest risk of disease. Shockingly, up to ten jabs are required if you’re travelling to Ethiopia, Nigeria and Pakistan - to name a few. Did you know that so many were needed?

With so many countries being at both medium and high risk, it’s clear to see just how important it is to get the correct vaccinations. Even some of the most popular travel destinations require vaccinations for safe travels, including Mexico, Greece and South Africa. It’s worth noting that the recommendation levels might be lower in some of these popular destinations, but it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

The next time you’re planning an adventure, you can use this interactive map as a guide, in order to make sure that you’re as protected as much as possible. It really is a life or death situation here, and your holiday shouldn’t have to be ruined by something so preventable.

How Do I Get A Vaccination?

Getting your recommended vaccinations has never been easier. Simply book an appointment with your GP around four to six weeks before your departure date; they’ll be able to do the vaccination for you and discuss any further instructions, too. The lifespan of the vaccination will entirely depend on which one you have been given, but roughly, they can last anything from a few months to several years.


Once again, the cost of the vaccine will completely depend on what it is for. Vaccines for high-risk diseases like Cholera and Typhoid are usually free to receive from the NHS, but for less common diseases such as Japanese Encephalitis, you will be expected to pay a fee. Don’t forget that when you’re purchasing something that's going to protect your life, it’s a small price to pay.

How much does the vaccine cost?

Vaccine Vaccine Cost
Cholera £70
Hepatitis B £195
Hepatitis A & B £255
Hepatitis A & Typhoid £100
Combined Diptheria, Tetanus & Polio £52
Influenza £10
Japanese Encephalitis £224
Meningitis ACWY £82
Meningitis B £300-£600
Rabies £255
Rabies - intradermal £159
Tick-borne Encephalitis £255
Typhoid £47
Yellow Fever £82
Hepatitis A £150
Tuberculosis (BCG) £77
Malaria £3.50

You can use the above table to figure out how much you will be expected to pay for the jab you are receiving. As you can see, the average cost for a vaccination is around £50, but the price will ultimately depend on the vaccine which is needed. More times than not, the prices will vary, so be sure to check with your GP for an updated price list.

Are Vaccines Worth The Money?

Paying for vaccinations is probably the last thing you want to do after paying for a holiday, but when you look at the bigger picture, they’re a worthwhile investment. Vaccinations not only prevent you from falling ill to a nasty disease; they prevent you from having to pay a hefty medical bill, too. Check out the below chart for an insight into just how expensive treatment costs are for various, preventable, diseases.

How Much Does The Treatment Cost?

Illness Treatment Cost
Cholera £70
Hepatitis B £8,977.63 - £15,505.93
Hepatitis A £255
Japanese Encephalitis £2,862.34 - £14,769.76
Meningitis ACWY £82
Meningitis B £300 - £600
Rabies £1,213.14
Tick-borne Encephalitis £2,862.34 - £14,769.76
Typhoid £55.13
Yellow Fever £82
Tuberculosis (BCG) £101,918.39
Malaria £2,120.41
Tetanus £58,871.11
Polio £5,896.52 - £38,310.33
Influenza

As you can see, there isn’t a single illness on the above table, which doesn’t come with a hefty treatment cost. When you next hesitate about paying £77 for a Tuberculosis jab or something similar, remember that you could be ending up with an illness which will cost over £100,000 to treat.

So, in short, yes - vaccines are certainly worth the money when your health is in the works.

How Many People Die From Not Getting Vaccinations?

Although there may be no legal requirements to get jabs done, it’s far too risky to put off getting them. In fact, an increasing number of people have lost their lives due to not getting vaccinations; is the risk really worth it?

To put this into perspective, there are an estimated 128,000 to 161,000 deaths each year from the disease Typhoid. Considering the vaccination to prevent this disease is free from the NHS, the numbers are very alarming.

How Many Death Are There Each Year?

Illness Number of Cases Deaths Per Year
Cholera 1.4 to 4.0 million 21,000 - 143,000
Hepatitis B 257 million 887,000
Hepatitis A 1.4 million 11,000
Japanese Encephalitis 68,000 3,600 - 20,400
Meningitis B 400 - 1,200 379,000
Rabies 15 million 59,000
Tick-borne Encephalitis 2,057 280
Typhoid 11-20 million 128,000 - 161,000
Yellow Fever 200 000 45,000
Malaria 300-600 million 1,000,000
Polio 22 1
Tuberculosis (BCG) 10 million 1.6 million
Influenza 3 to 5 million 290,000 - 650,000
Tetanus 12,476 72,600

Other alarming cases included 1,000,000 deaths a year from Malaria and 887,000 from Hepatitis B. Of course, the risk of dying from these diseases will depend on which country you live in and the standard of healthcare available, but these numbers alone should highlight just how easy it is to catch bugs when you aren’t protected.

Things To Remember

Once you’ve had your vaccination, your doctor might tell you to take some medication throughout the duration of your trip. This is a common practice for anti-malaria in particular, and luckily, you can buy our anti-malaria tablets online if you’re prescribed them.

Your overall health will be taken into consideration before you are given the vaccination, as those with poor health may not be able to receive it.

If you are travelling to central Europe, North America or Australia, then the chances of you needing a jab are very slim. However, please check with your GP.

Vaccinations might be uncomfortable, but catching a disease will be far worse. Look after yourself!