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Taking a Winter Ski Trip? Here’s How to Stay Healthy in High Altitude

Posted Friday 02 February 2018 10:03 by Tim Deakin in Altitude Sickness

Mountain sickness can ruin a winter break, so here’s everything you need to know to stay safe and healthy

After the excitement and indulgence of the festive period, it’s easy to feel a little down for the rest of winter. The weather’s still cold, the nights are still dark, and the celebrations are over. To counteract this, a growing number of us turn to the solution of a winter break to keep the fun going. For many of us in the UK, this means a picturesque ski trip to lift the spirits.

And whilst a ski trip is a great way to break up your winter, it’s important that you know how to ensure sickness doesn’t ruin your getaway. Altitude sickness can strike at any time if you are travelling way above sea level, so here’s all the information you need to guarantee your family a happy, healthy winter ski trip.

What is altitude sickness?

Altitude sickness, or acute mountain sickness, is a condition which occurs when you travel to a high altitude too quickly, meaning your body cannot adjust and function properly. As a result, breathing becomes difficult because you cannot take in as much oxygen as you normally would.

Any altitude above 8,000 feet is considered high, meaning the risk of acute mountain sickness is present. However, for most people the condition will occur at heights of 12,000 feet or higher, as at 12,000 feet there are roughly 40% fewer oxygen molecules per breath than at sea level.

If ignored, altitude sickness can result in an emergency medical situation.

Causes of altitude sickness

Factors such as physical fitness, age or sex have no bearing on your likelihood of obtaining altitude sickness when away. You also shouldn’t assume that just because you haven’t suffered from acute mountain sickness when skiing in the past, you won’t suffer from it in the future. Anybody can suffer from the symptoms of altitude sickness at a given time.

Symptoms of altitude sickness

Altitude sickness symptoms can include:

- Dizziness

- Tiredness

- Nausea

- Vomiting

- Headaches

- Shortness of breath

- Loss of appetite

Symptoms of altitude sickness don’t usually develop straight away, often taking between 6 and 24 hours to occur after you’ve been exposed to high altitudes. Symptoms are usually worse at night, and can feel similar to those of a particularly bad hangover.

Altitude sickness prevention

When you are in the UK, it is very unlikely that an individual will suffer from acute mountain sickness as the highest peak — Scotland’s Ben Nevis — is only 1,345 metres high, which is equivalent to 4,413 feet. However, this is the time of year when many of us head overseas for winter ski trips, so it’s more important now than ever to get to grips with prevention and treatment for altitude sickness.

In order to avoid altitude sickness, you should travel to altitudes above 8,000 feet slowly to allow your body to get used to your surroundings. You should also:

- Take 2-3 days to get used to high altitudes before going above 8,000 feet

- Avoid flying directly into high altitudes

- Rest every 600-900 metres you climb

- Avoid climbing more than 300-500 metres in a single day

- Drink plenty of fluids

- Avoid strenuous exercise for the first day of your trip

- Eat light, high calorie meals

- Avoid alcohol and smoking

- Medication for altitude sickness

Acetazolamide is an effective medication for the prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness. It works by reducing the amount of fluid in the head and lungs, improving breathing and helping us adjust more quickly to higher altitudes. It should be taken initially 1-2 days before entering a high altitude area, and for at least a further two days after reaching your peak altitude.

Acetazolamide is available from Express Pharmacy.

For altitude sickness tablets or other effective NHS-approved medication for a variety of conditions, contact Express Pharmacy. You can use our discreet diagnosis process to find the right treatment for your condition, or call the team on 0208 123 07 03.

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Knowing When to Visit the Doctor Could Be Crucial to Easing the Burden on the NHS

Posted Thursday 16 March 2017 09:57 by Tim Deakin in Express Pharmacy

The government recently admitted that the NHS will need £1bn in order to cover the cost of personal injury claims. Money it can ill afford.

According to a recent report, the NHS will need an estimated £1bn bailout to cover the cost of personal injury compensation claims. With such a hefty bill adding to the already overstretched healthcare budget, what can we do to prevent the health service from reaching breaking point?

Knowing when you need the help of a doctor and knowing when to simply rest and take over the counter medication may sound simple, but it could actually save billions of pounds a year. As GP surgeries become busier and busier it is advised that people take ownership of their own illness rather than making a routine trip to the doctor. Importantly, this advice should not deter those with serious conditions that require immediate treatment.

Here are some of the health complaints that a GP should not encounter from day to day:

Leave your cold at home

Research at the end of 2016 found that there had been over five million visits to GP offices for blocked noses, forty thousand for dandruff and twenty thousand for travel sickness.

While blocked noses can be uncomfortable and travel sickness can be a nasty affliction, it is important to be aware that a doctor will only prescribe medication that is readily available over the counter in your local pharmacist. A simple trip to your nearest community pharmacy or a check online with us should be the first port of call when you are suffering from a problem that does not warrant a GP appointment.

For conditions such as altitude sickness, acid reflux, erectile dysfunction, period pains or hair loss, pharmacists are well equipped to treat you and put your mind at ease.

Minor symptoms and illnesses are responsible for 57 million GP visits in the UK, as well as nearly four million A&E admissions every year. Sprains made up 38% of these A&E admissions last year, while 17% of them were for flu like symptoms, and 13% were for insect bites. All this put together costs the NHS around £2 billion – twice as much as their personal injury claim debt!

Learn the art of self-care

One in five GP appointments are reported to be for minor, self-treatable symptoms. Therefore, encouraging patients to practice self-care could save doctors more than an hour every day. That’s a lot of free time that could be used to work through a waiting room full of serious conditions.

Self-care is exactly what it says on the tin – an individual taking the time to look after both their physical and mental health. Lifestyle diseases, i.e. conditions that are attributable to the way we live, make up 75% of diseases in the UK. This shows that making a few small changes to our daily routines could help us avoid GP visits altogether.

When it comes to physical health, drinking more water, eating three healthy meals a day and doing even a small amount of exercise can make a huge difference. Cutting out bad habits like smoking or excess alcohol consumption also helps. Similarly, therapeutic activities and breathing exercises can help your mental health by lowering stress and anxiety.

Turn to Express Pharmacy for help

Our three-step online treatment programme allows you to select a treatment, undergo a free consultation and purchase your required medicine without any hassle and with complete discretion – all from the comfort of your own home.

Express Pharmacy provides NHS approved medical help, treatment and advice without the need to use up doctor time.

If you are experiencing an illness or a problem that is a significant issue to you but not one that warrants visiting your GP, don’t hesitate to try our discreet live chat today and find out what we can do for you.

Altitude Sickness 101

Posted Tuesday 03 January 2017 14:41 by Tim Deakin in Altitude Sickness

altitude sicknessIf you are the adventurous type and love the outdoors there are few greater thrills than embarking on a trek or a climb. From Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to Khuiten in Mongolia, the Matterhorn in Switzerland to Annapurna in Nepal, there’s no better way to challenge yourself – to be rewarded by stunning views and a life-changing experience.

But while the physical and mental challenges of trekking are to be respected, one of the most important factors that anybody travelling up in the world needs to understand is the effect of altitude on the body. Altitude sickness has little respect for strength or physical fitness and can come in a number of forms. These include:

AMS: Acute Mountain Sickness

Common symptoms include headache, nausea, dizziness and exhaustion

HAPE: High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

Fluid on the lungs causing breathlessness. Often this is accompanied by a fever and a cough that produces frothy spit.

HACE: High Altitude Cerebral Edema

Fluid on the brain causing confusion, clumsiness, deterioriating levels of confusion

While cases of HAPE and HACE are extremely dangerous to climbers attempting high altitudes, they usually develop at altitudes of 3,600 metres. Much more common is AMS, which can affect day hikers and climbers at around 2,500 metres, although it is possible amongst those who ascend quickly to a height in excess of 1500 metres above sea level.

What causes altitude sickness?

Altitude sickness is related to the thinning of the air as you ascend higher above sea level. The greater the elevation, the fewer the number of oxygen molecules per break. Above 3000 metres, 75% of people will experience mild altitude sickness due to the depletion of oxygen in the body.

Suffering from altitude sickness is not a sign of physical weakness or age. In fact, age, gender and fitness levels have little to do with a person’s likelihood of getting altitude sickness.

Treating altitude sickness

While it is possible to acclimatize to the thinner air at altitude, people should take great care when attempting to spend a prolonged time at a height above 2500 metres. Ascending slowly (less than 500 metres per day) can help and staying hydrated and fuelled at all times is also important. Prescription medications such as Acetazolamide can also be effective in preventing and treating altitude sickness to decrease symptoms such as headaches, tiredness, nausea and shortness of breath.

Buy Acetazolamide now

For those suffering from AMS during an ascent, resting for 24 hours and taking Acetazolamide can help. If the symptoms subside it is safe to continue a climb. However, if the symptoms persevere, it is advisable to descend to a safe level to recover. If you find yourself suffering from HAPE or HACE then you should descend immediately with the help of those travelling with you.

Are there other remedies or medications that can help?

Although there is anecdotal evidence and old wives tales about other treatments and herbal remedies that are claimed to prevent altitude sickness, there are no proven alternatives to Acetazolamide. Indeed, some herbal remedies can have dangerous side effects or simply worsen the problem.

If you wish to discuss the symptoms of altitude sickness or discuss preparations for an upcoming trek further, why not consult one of our pharmacists today. Try our Live Chat facility or call 0208 123 0703.

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